Jonathan Evershed

Jonathan Evershed

University College Cork
Postdoctoral Researcher

RT @annita_mcveigh: .@MalcH @aberdeenuni tells us about the ‘4 tribes’ in Scottish politics right now as voters consider #Brexit & #Indepen…

2 hours ago

RT @EuropaInstitute: Calling all @uoessps students! Exchange applications have opened for spending a year abroad in 2020/21. Find out mor…

3 hours ago

RT @PolStudiesAssoc: Our #PSA20 Convening Team are working hard on decisions for the upcoming conference. Due to the incredible response, w…

3 hours ago

@Coree_Brown will be presenting 'Should we stay or should we go? A tale of 5 referendums' in #Aberdeen… https://t.co/2uq3udYdnq

7 hours ago

Posts by this author

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General Election 2019 in Northern Ireland: Unionist U-turns and pro-Remain pacts

The 2019 General Election signals a dramatic change in the Northern Irish political landscape. Jonathan Evershed, University College Cork, analyses whats happening in key seats throughout the country and tackles the issues that will dominate the debate.
Stormont

High noon for the DUP: The Brexit Deal, ‘Consent’ and the Abortion Debate in Northern Ireland

Jonathan Evershed of University College Cork explores the DUP strategy ahead of Saturday's debates.
Irish border

The Northern Ireland-only backstop revisited

Amid growing speculation that Boris Johnson is prepared to look again at a Northern Ireland-only backstop, CCC Fellow Jonathan Evershed asks whether and how it might provide a solution to the Brexit logjam.
20 years devolution

The rise of the ‘others’: 20 years after devolution, a new middle ground in Northern Irish politics?

Jonathan Evershed looks at the recent success of middle ground parties in Northern Ireland.

The DUP and no-deal tariffs: double standards?

Jonathan Evershed of University College Cork asks whether the UK Government’s new tariff plan is a case of double standards and, if so, why the silence so far from the DUP?

Brexit and the Irish backstop: Where are we now?

Theresa May's public recognition of the realities of the Norther Irish border in her Commons speech withdrawing the Meaningful Vote was, says Jonathan Evershed, much too little and far too late.