Michael Kenny

Governance, Centre on Constitutional Change
University of Cambridge
Professor of Public Policy

Biography

Professor Michael Kenny is Director of the Cambridge Institute for Public Policy. Prior to moving to Cambridge, he held posts at Queen Mary Univresity London, Queen’s University, Belfast, the College of William and Mary in the US, and Sheffield University. He has been awarded Visiting Fellowships at: Wolfson College, Oxford; the Centre for Research into the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities at Cambridge; and, most recently, the Centre for Science and Policy at Cambridge. From September 2012 to August 2014 he held a Leverhulme Trust Major Research Fellowship.  In addition to being a fellow of the Centre on Constitutional Change, he is currently a Visiting Fellow at the UCL’s Constitution Unit, sits on the Leverhulme Trust’s Advisory Committee, is co-director of the British Academy’s “Governing England” programme, and is a member of an external experts panel convened by the Scottish Parliament to advise on the constitutional implications of Brexit.

Twitter - @michaelkenny_

 

Posts by this author

COVID-19 paper

Territorial governance and the coronavirus crisis

Michael Kenny and Jack Sheldon, University of Cambridge, discuss the seemingly co-ordinated approach from governments throughout the UK in response to the coronavirus, but all may not be as harmonious as it seems.
English flags

England's territorial politics after Brexit

England's regional governance is going to become more prominent in policy terms because of the implications of Brexit. But what to do about devolution in England? Michael Kenny states that the new UK Government will have a challenge navigating territorial tensions.
Boris Johnson

How can Boris Johnson keep the UK together?

Boris Johnson used his victory speech to restate his intention to lead a 'one nation' government. But he made no direct reference to either Scotland or Northern Ireland, where the 'one nation' idea is under most obvious threat. Michael Kenny and Jack Sheldon, Bennett Institute for Public Policy, consider whether Boris Johnson is likely to be the last Prime Minister of a United Kingdom.
The English Question and Brexit

The English Question and Brexit

Is the English General Election campaign indifferent to the territorial debates happening elsewhere in the UK? Michael Kenny, the Bennett Institute for Public Policy, argues that the long-awaited questions about England and the union have moved into the heart of domestic politics.
Divergence

Whatever happened to Tory unionism?

When the Withdrawal Agreement negotiated by Theresa May was debated in the House of Commons many Conservative MPs argued that they could not vote for an arrangement that would treat Northern Ireland differently from Great Britain. The revised deal negotiated by Boris Johnson envisages far greater divergence within the UK, yet is far more popular among Conservatives. Jack Sheldon and Michael Kenny explain how this u-turn has come about.
break up of the UK

Will a no deal Brexit lead to the break-up of the UK?

Michael Kenny and Jack Sheldon from The Bennett Institute, University of Cambridge, address the gap and explore what a no-deal Brexit might mean for the domestic Union – could the UK break apart as a result?