Jack Sheldon

Bennett Institute for Public Policy
Research Assistant, 'Between Two Unions - The Constitutional Future of the Islands after Brexit'

Biography

Jack Sheldon is a Research Assistant at the Bennett Institute for Public Policy working with Professor Michael Kenny on the ESRC funded project ‘Between Two Unions: The Constitutional Future of the Islands after Brexit’.

Prior to joining the University of Cambridge in January 2016, Jack was a Research Assistant at the Constitution Unit, University College London. At the Constitution Unit he co-authored a report on Options for an English Parliament and was editor of the Constitution Unit blog and newsletter.

Jack holds an MA in Politics and Contemporary History from King’s College London and a BA in Politics from Queen Mary, University of London. In October 2018 he will begin a PhD at Cambridge, funded by the ESRC. His doctoral research will focus on the impact changes to the UK’s territorial constitution have had on the roles performed by MPs at Westminster.

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Posts by this author

Downing Street

The next PM's territorial challenges

Jack Sheldon (Bennett Institute, University of Cambridge) looks at the constitutional issues facing Britain's next Prime Minister.

What does Bercow’s bombshell ruling mean for Brexit and parliament?

Westminster’s seemingly endless Brexit drama has taken yet another twist with Commons Speaker John Bercow’s ruling that the government cannot bring forward a third ‘meaningful vote’ on its Brexit deal without a substantive change to the proposition. What does it all mean? CCC Fellow Jack Sheldon (Bennett Institute of Public Policy, Cambridge) looks behind the headlines.
Parliament

Unionism and the Conservative Brexit deal rebellion

Concerns about the implications of the Irish backstop for the integrity of the domestic Union contributed significantly to the scale of the 118-strong backbench rebellion that led to Theresa May’s Withdrawal Agreement being defeated last week, by the extraordinary margin of 432 to 202. What do the arguments made during the Commons debate tell us about the nature of the ‘unionism’ that prevails in the contemporary Conservative Party?
Brexit Jack

Beyond the backstop: understanding Unionist sentiment in the Brexit debate

Conservative MPs who offer their Unionism as the basis of their rejection of the Withdrawal Agreement have a very particular understanding of both the Union and Conservatism, says Jack Sheldon.

Intergovernmental relations and the English question: options for reform

A week after the state of intergovernmental relations (IGR) in the UK was highlighted by the UK government’s law officers standing in opposition to their devolved counterparts in the UK Supreme Court, the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee published a report on improving IGR after Brexit. Jack Sheldon discusses the methods by which England could gain distinct representation — something it currently lacks — in a new IGR system.
downing street

The UK-Welsh agreement on Brexit and devolved powers, and why it matters for the UK as a whole

Amendments to controversial Clause 11 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill were agreed in the House of Lords yesterday evening, following a deal between the UK and Welsh governments last week. Jack Sheldon and Mike Kenny explain the significance of this agreement for the UK as a whole and outline a number of unresolved issues it raises.