Jack Sheldon

Bennett Institute for Public Policy
Research Assistant, 'Between Two Unions - The Constitutional Future of the Islands after Brexit'

Biography

Jack Sheldon is a Research Assistant at the Bennett Institute for Public Policy working with Professor Michael Kenny on the ESRC funded project ‘Between Two Unions: The Constitutional Future of the Islands after Brexit’.

Prior to joining the University of Cambridge in January 2016, Jack was a Research Assistant at the Constitution Unit, University College London. At the Constitution Unit he co-authored a report on Options for an English Parliament and was editor of the Constitution Unit blog and newsletter.

Jack holds an MA in Politics and Contemporary History from King’s College London and a BA in Politics from Queen Mary, University of London. In October 2018 he will begin a PhD at Cambridge, funded by the ESRC. His doctoral research will focus on the impact changes to the UK’s territorial constitution have had on the roles performed by MPs at Westminster.

Should we be worried by representation amongst politicians❓ @CairneyPaul and Michael Keating discuss representatio… https://t.co/V3SQfTyO45

2 hours ago

'Especially on Brexit issues, trust between the governments was low before the election. It is likely to be even lo… https://t.co/mUnty8eBOU

3 hours ago

RT @UKandEU: LISTEN NOW to brand new @WhatScotsThink podcast from our senior fellow Sir John Curtice, covering attitudes towards indyref2,…

19 hours ago

Following the #Spanish elections last April and elections to @Europarl_EN last May, @j_sijstermans discusses how… https://t.co/cr9Z5rENRD

21 hours ago

Posts by this author

House of Commons

What does the election result mean for territorial representation in the House of Commons?

The distribution of MPs is not even across the UK, this could have a significant impact on how the House of Commons handles key matters related to Brexit and the union, argues Jack Sheldon, the Bennett Institute of Public Policy.
Boris Johnson

How can Boris Johnson keep the UK together?

Boris Johnson used his victory speech to restate his intention to lead a 'one nation' government. But he made no direct reference to either Scotland or Northern Ireland, where the 'one nation' idea is under most obvious threat. Michael Kenny and Jack Sheldon, Bennett Institute for Public Policy, consider whether Boris Johnson is likely to be the last Prime Minister of a United Kingdom.
Yes No

The next parliament will face big dilemmas on Scottish independence

With the Scottish government focused on securing an independence referendum in 2020, the next UK parliament is set to face difficult dilemmas on how to deal with the matter. Jack Sheldon's blog for LSE, explains why the current position of the parties involved, and the trajectory of party support in different parts of the UK, mean that there is a real risk to stumbling towards another major crisis in the UK's territorial constitution.
Analysing the Manifestos: Conservatives

Analysing the Manifestos: Strengthen the Union

In the second edition of our series analysing where parties stand on constitutional issues, Jack Sheldon looks at where the Conservatives stand on Brexit and Scottish independence.
Divergence

Whatever happened to Tory unionism?

When the Withdrawal Agreement negotiated by Theresa May was debated in the House of Commons many Conservative MPs argued that they could not vote for an arrangement that would treat Northern Ireland differently from Great Britain. The revised deal negotiated by Boris Johnson envisages far greater divergence within the UK, yet is far more popular among Conservatives. Jack Sheldon and Michael Kenny explain how this u-turn has come about.
break up of the UK

Will a no deal Brexit lead to the break-up of the UK?

Michael Kenny and Jack Sheldon from The Bennett Institute, University of Cambridge, address the gap and explore what a no-deal Brexit might mean for the domestic Union – could the UK break apart as a result?