Welfare

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Allen,A.D (2012) Buying Votes, Building Identities: Federal Social Policy Responses to Sub-State Nationalism in Québec. American Review of Canadian Studies. 42 2 210-235.

Cohen, B.J and Rønning, W. (forthcoming 2014) ‘Education in Norway and Scotland: Developing and Re-forming the systems’ in  Bryden, J. Riddoch,L. and Brox,O. Northern Neighbours. Norway and Scotland since the Middle Ages.  Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

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This week, we are highlighting the contributions of our fellows to Scotland's Decision: 16 Questions to think about for the referendum on 18 September.  Today’s topic is the what sort of Scotland might we see post referendum? The book is available as a free download.

Thinking about ‘what sort of Scotland’ we might see after the referendum, our experts explore the following:

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There has been a notable shift in the Better Together campaign in recent weeks. The Labour Party appears to be finding its voice, while the UK government, recognising that its own interventions may be counter-productive, appears to have vacated some space to allow Labour’s big hitters to come to the fore.

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Re-thinking Welfare: Fair, Personal and Simple

This is the 2nd report of the Expert Working Group on Welfare looking at the medium and long term options for welfare in an independent Scotland.

Last year, the Group published their first report. In that they scrutinised the Scottish Government’s work on assessing the cost of benefit payments in an independent Scotland and the delivery of those payments.

Political scientists have long known that winning elections is often not a matter of having detailed policies and distinguishing oneself from one’s opponents. Instead, it is a matter of seizing ownership of issues on which there is broad agreement and defining them on your own terms. So historically, the Conservatives have ‘owned’ the issue of law and order, until New Labour tried to edge in. Conversely, Labour has usually owned the NHS, forcing the Conservatives to assure electors that it is safe in their hands.

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Scotland analysis: Work and pensions paper


This paper examines what Scottish independence would mean for social security – including state, private and public sector pensions – and supporting people into work. It sets out the current UK-wide arrangements and how they provide targeted and effective support to pensioners, jobseekers, employers and those needing support from the social security system. It highlights:

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Latest blogs

  • 19th February 2019

    Over the course of the UK’s preparations for withdrawing from the EU, the issue of the UK’s own internal market has emerged as an issue of concern, and one that has the potentially significant consequences for devolution. Dr Jo Hunt of Cardiff University examines the implications.

  • 12th February 2019

    CCC Fellow Professor Daniel Wincott of Cardiff University examines how Brexit processes have already reshaped territorial politics in the UK and changed its territorial constitution.

  • 7th February 2019

    The future of agriculture policy across the United Kingdom after Brexit is uncertain and risky, according to a new paper by Professor Michael Keating of the Centre on Constitutional Change. Reforms of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy over recent years have shifted the emphasis from farming to the broader concept of rural policy. As member states have gained more discretion in applying policy, the nations of the UK have also diverged, according to local conditions and preferences.

  • 4th February 2019

    In our latest report for the "Repatriation of Competences: Implications for Devolution" project, Professor Nicola McEwen and Dr Alexandra Remond examine how, in the longer term, Brexit poses significant risks for the climate and energy ambitions of the devolved nations. These include the loss of European Structural and Investment Funds targeted at climate and low carbon energy policies, from which the devolved territories have benefited disproportionately. European Investment Bank loan funding, which has financed high risk renewables projects, especially in Scotland, may also no longer be as accessible, while future access to research and innovation funding remains uncertain. The removal of the EU policy framework, which has incentivised the low carbon ambitions of the devolved nations may also result in lost opportunities.

  • 1st February 2019

    The outcome of the various Commons votes this week left certain only that the Government would either secure an amended deal and put it to a meaningful vote on Wednesday 13 February, or in the overwhelmingly likely absence of this make a further statement that day and table another amendable motion for the following day, the Groundhog Day that may lead to a ‘St Valentine’s Day Massacre’ for one side or the other. Richard Parry assesses the further two-week pause in parliamentary action on Brexit

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