Welfare

Hide tag: 
Show

Allen,A.D (2012) Buying Votes, Building Identities: Federal Social Policy Responses to Sub-State Nationalism in Québec. American Review of Canadian Studies. 42 2 210-235.

Cohen, B.J and Rønning, W. (forthcoming 2014) ‘Education in Norway and Scotland: Developing and Re-forming the systems’ in  Bryden, J. Riddoch,L. and Brox,O. Northern Neighbours. Norway and Scotland since the Middle Ages.  Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

Read More

This week, we are highlighting the contributions of our fellows to Scotland's Decision: 16 Questions to think about for the referendum on 18 September.  Today’s topic is the what sort of Scotland might we see post referendum? The book is available as a free download.

Thinking about ‘what sort of Scotland’ we might see after the referendum, our experts explore the following:

Read More

There has been a notable shift in the Better Together campaign in recent weeks. The Labour Party appears to be finding its voice, while the UK government, recognising that its own interventions may be counter-productive, appears to have vacated some space to allow Labour’s big hitters to come to the fore.

Read More

Re-thinking Welfare: Fair, Personal and Simple

This is the 2nd report of the Expert Working Group on Welfare looking at the medium and long term options for welfare in an independent Scotland.

Last year, the Group published their first report. In that they scrutinised the Scottish Government’s work on assessing the cost of benefit payments in an independent Scotland and the delivery of those payments.

Political scientists have long known that winning elections is often not a matter of having detailed policies and distinguishing oneself from one’s opponents. Instead, it is a matter of seizing ownership of issues on which there is broad agreement and defining them on your own terms. So historically, the Conservatives have ‘owned’ the issue of law and order, until New Labour tried to edge in. Conversely, Labour has usually owned the NHS, forcing the Conservatives to assure electors that it is safe in their hands.

Read More

Scotland analysis: Work and pensions paper


This paper examines what Scottish independence would mean for social security – including state, private and public sector pensions – and supporting people into work. It sets out the current UK-wide arrangements and how they provide targeted and effective support to pensioners, jobseekers, employers and those needing support from the social security system. It highlights:

Pages

Latest blogs

  • 20th July 2018

    Richard Parry reviews a fast-evolving situation as the march of time and need to reconcile rhetoric and practicality constrain policy-makers

  • 13th July 2018

    The White Paper published this week talks about the UK Government making ‘sovereign decisions’ to adopt European rules but, as we know from the experience of Norway and Switzerland, this can be an illusory sovereignty when the costs of deviating from the rules is exclusion from the single market or European programmes. CCC Director Professor Michael Keating looks at whether the UK is ready for this kind of deal.

  • 12th July 2018

    Last week the government released its fisheries white paper. While most of the fisheries and Brexit debate centres on quotas and access to waters, there is also an important devolution dimension. Brexit already has profound consequences for the UK’s devolution settlement and fisheries policy is one example of this. So, in addition to communicating its overall vision for post-Brexit fisheries policy, the white paper was also an opportunity for the government to set out how it would see that policy working in the devolved UK.

  • 4th July 2018

    At the same time as Parliament prepares to ‘take back control’ from Brussels, the executive is in fact accruing to itself further control over the legislative process. CCC Fellow Professor Stephen Tierney addresses a number of trends – only some of which are a direct consequence of the unique circumstances of Brexit – which suggest a deeper realignment of institutional power within the constitution and a consequent diminution of Parliament’s legislative power.

  • 27th June 2018

    Faced with a choice between splitting her Cabinet into winners and losers, Theresa May has sought to keep the Brexit crap game going. She does this by avoiding betting on either a hard or soft Brexit. Professor Richard Rose of Strathclyde looks at the high stakes outcomes facing the Prime Minister. .

Read More Posts