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Anyone watching the Labour leadership’s refusal to rule out a post-election agreement with the SNP, would be forgiven for thinking such an arrangement was unique. However, explains Daniel Cetrà, pro-independence parties offering support to minority governments is nothing new – as evidenced by Spain.

There has been a great deal of comment recently about the prospect of the SNP supporting a minority Labour government in Westminster.

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Polls indicate that the general election will see a fundamental rewriting of the Scottish political landscape, with the SNP poised for a near sweep. The party also seems poised to take over from Labour as leaders on the issue of women’s representation in this election at least, although it is far from clear whether that will translate into support for quotas in the future, write Meryl Kenny and Fiona Mackay.

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The turnout out for last year's referendum broke all records and is now the subject of extensive research. Dr Malcolm Harvey considers the experience and what implications it may, or may not, have for May's general election. This article originally appeared in The Herald.
 
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Malcolm Harvey on politics being anything but predictable. This post originally appeared in the print copy of the Press and Journal.
 
There are lies, damned lies, and statistics: a phrase frequently attributed to Mark Twain. In an election year, parties might do well to keep the quote in mind.
 
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This weekend's widely-publicised poll commissioned by Wings Over Scotland confirms research conducted by CCC Fellow Professor Ailsa Henderson last year that the Scots and English are not as far apart in terms of social attitudes as some might have us believe. This research was used as the focus of her chapter in Sex, Lies and the Ballot Box.

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David Eiser asks how much difference do economic arguments make to people’s attitudes and voting intentions? 

Whether the issue was currency choice, the affordability of future policy proposals, or the policy options available to a small, open economy in a globalised world, economic arguments were at the heart of Scotland’s referendum debate. 

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  • 10th August 2018

    Brexit is re-making the UK’s constitution under our noses. The territorial constitution is particularly fragile. Pursuing Brexit, Theresa May’s government has stumbled into deep questions about devolution.

  • 8th August 2018

    The UK in a Changing Europe has formed a new Brexit Policy Panel (BPP). The BPP is a cross-disciplinary group of over 100 leading social scientists created to provide ongoing analysis of where we have got to in the Brexit process, and to forecast where we are headed. Members of the UK in a Changing Europe Brexit Policy Panel complete a monthly survey addressing three key areas of uncertainty around Brexit: if —and when—the UK will leave the EU; how Brexit will affect British politics; and what our relationship with the EU is likely to look like in the future. The CCC participates on the Panel.

  • 2nd August 2018

    The House of Commons Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee issued its report ‘Devolution and Exiting the EU: reconciling differences and building strong relationships’. Discussing its contents, Professor Nicola McEwen suggests that the report includes some practical recommendations, some of which were informed by CCC research. It also shines a light on some of the more difficult challenges ahead.

  • 31st July 2018

    The politicisation of Brexit, combined with deteriorating relations between London and Dublin, has created a toxic atmosphere in Northern Ireland, says Mary Murphy, which will require imagination and possibly new institutions to resolve.

  • 25th July 2018

    Given that there are many policy differences between Northern Ireland and other parts of the UK, asks Jonathan Evershed, why has customs policy been singled out as a red line by Unionists?

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