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Twenty years after the Belfast agreement was signed, new research identifies an enduring legacy. 
 
Fresh analysis of the Belfast or Good Friday Agreement in Northern Ireland has revealed its lasting impact on subsequent peace deals worldwide.
 
Key elements of the settlement between Nationalists, Republicans and Unionists and the Irish and British governments – agreed in Belfast 20 years ago – have been instrumental in other peace negotiations, the study reveals. 
 
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Robert A. Young (1950-2017)

Michael Keating remembers his friend and colleague Prof Bob Young who has passed away. Prof Young was a member of the Centre's advisory board and a tireless supporter of our work. 

The Centre's Asscoaite Director, Prof Nicola McEwen, has received an award recognising excellence in public engagement. 
 
CCC Associate Director, Professor Nicola McEwen, has been awarded the Political Studies Association’s (PSA) prestigious Public Understanding of Politics Award. 
 
The award was given for Prof McEwen’s work at the Centre on Constitutional Change helping the public grapple with the complexities modern politics. 
 
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If you’re staying up to watch the results of the elections tonight, you’ll have their choice of friends and fellows of the Centre to keep you company through the night and into Friday. 
 
You can join us on: 
 
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House of Lords Committee Appoints Prof David Bell as Adviser

Professor David Bell, a fellow of the Centre, has been appointed as the specialist adviser to the House of Lords Economic Affairs Committee.
 
Professor Bell, based at the University of Stirling, will advise the committee in their inquiry into possible models for the devolution of public finances in the UK.
 

New ESRC Fellows Appointed

Professor Nicola McEwen has been appointed to one of four 'Knowledge Exchange' fellowships intended to inform and nuture public discussion around the area of consitutional change. McEwen is joined by Professor Richard Wyn Jones, of the University ofd Cardiff and also a Fellow of the Centre. 

The fellowships will run for six to eight months and will provide an opportunity for academics to work with community and public organisations in understanding the impact of constitutional change. 

Latest blogs

  • 20th July 2018

    Richard Parry reviews a fast-evolving situation as the march of time and need to reconcile rhetoric and practicality constrain policy-makers

  • 13th July 2018

    The White Paper published this week talks about the UK Government making ‘sovereign decisions’ to adopt European rules but, as we know from the experience of Norway and Switzerland, this can be an illusory sovereignty when the costs of deviating from the rules is exclusion from the single market or European programmes. CCC Director Professor Michael Keating looks at whether the UK is ready for this kind of deal.

  • 12th July 2018

    Last week the government released its fisheries white paper. While most of the fisheries and Brexit debate centres on quotas and access to waters, there is also an important devolution dimension. Brexit already has profound consequences for the UK’s devolution settlement and fisheries policy is one example of this. So, in addition to communicating its overall vision for post-Brexit fisheries policy, the white paper was also an opportunity for the government to set out how it would see that policy working in the devolved UK.

  • 4th July 2018

    At the same time as Parliament prepares to ‘take back control’ from Brussels, the executive is in fact accruing to itself further control over the legislative process. CCC Fellow Professor Stephen Tierney addresses a number of trends – only some of which are a direct consequence of the unique circumstances of Brexit – which suggest a deeper realignment of institutional power within the constitution and a consequent diminution of Parliament’s legislative power.

  • 27th June 2018

    Faced with a choice between splitting her Cabinet into winners and losers, Theresa May has sought to keep the Brexit crap game going. She does this by avoiding betting on either a hard or soft Brexit. Professor Richard Rose of Strathclyde looks at the high stakes outcomes facing the Prime Minister. .

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