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A previous piece on the potential for “A Scottish Nordic Model” outlined how the Nordic states developed their particular brand of social democratic social investment states commonly lauded as “The Nordic Model”.  I don’t want to repeat those arguments, but I do wish to add a little more to those ideas.

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The Results

Last Monday, the centre-right and federalist Quebec Liberal Party (PLQ) won a clear majority victory and the centre-left sovereignist Parti Québécois (PQ) suffered a historical defeat. Philippe Couillard will be the new premier of Quebec.

The PQ held a minority government and had called the election in a bid to turn it into a majority, but in light of the results the head of the party Pauline Marois, who failed to win her own seat, resigned.

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In a piece originally published at The Conversation, ESRC research assistant and University of Edinburgh PhD student Dani Cetra discusses Catalonia's efforts to introduce a referendum on independence.

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Coree Brown rounds up the latest blogs on the Scottish independence debate. This week's summary includes features on implications of independence for Scotland and the UK, reflections on Europe and 
 
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The Scottish independence debate may, at times, seem parochial, but its reach is global. We often seem to focus on narrow Scottish issues but the big questions travel well: what should be the size of a nation state? Should large countries have central, regional and local governments? If so, how should we share those responsibilities and coordinate policymaking between levels of government? Which policy areas should be centralized and which devolved? Should regions have taxation and spending powers?

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States’ visions of their foreign policies typically have four elements, or pillars:  protection, profits, principles, and pride.  The Scottish Government’s White Paper released last month is no exception. 

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Latest blogs

  • 22nd January 2019

    The UK is increasingly polarised by Brexit identities and they seem to have become stronger than party identities, a new academic report finds. Only one in 16 people did not have a Brexit identity, while more than one in five said they had no party identity. Sir John Curtice’s latest analysis of public opinion on a further referendum finds there has been no decisive shift in favour of another referendum. The report, Brexit and public opinion 2019, by The UK in a Changing Europe, provides an authoritative, comprehensive and up-to-date guide to public opinion on each of the key issues around Brexit. CCC Fellow, Dr Coree Brown Swan contributed a chapter on "the SNP, Brexit and the politics of independence"

  • 22nd January 2019

    In the papers accompanying the draft Environment (Principles and Governance) Bill published at the end of 2018, the UK Government says that it is “exploring opportunities to co-design the final proposals with the devolved administrations.” There are clear benefits in having strong co-operation and collaboration across the UK in the oversight of our environmental law and performance. Yet the challenge of finding a way forward in terms of working together is substantial since each part of the UK is in a different position at present. Given where things stand today, it may be better to accept that a good resolution is not possible immediately and to revisit the issue at a later stage - so long as there is a strong commitment to return and not allow interim arrangements to become fixed. Colin Reid, Professor of Environmental Law at the University of Dundee examines the issues.

  • 17th January 2019

    Richard Parry assesses a memorable day in UK parliamentary history as the Commons splits 432-202 on 15 January 2019 against the Government's recommended Brexit route. It was the most dramatic night at Westminster since the Labour government’s defeat on a confidence motion in 1979.

  • 17th January 2019

    What is the Irish government’s Brexit wish-list? The suggestion that Irish unity, as opposed to safeguarding political and economic stability, is the foremost concern of the Irish government is to misunderstand and misrepresent the motivations of this key Brexit stakeholder, writes Mary C. Murphy (University College Cork).

  • 17th January 2019

    Brexit is in trouble but not because of the Irish backstop, argues the CCC's Michael Keating.

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