Fiscal Policy

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For the Scottish Conservatives, the publication of the Strathclyde Commission report on further devolution marks another significant moment in a long journey for the party. Having passed from strident opposition to a Scottish Parliament to the Calman Commission and lines in the sand, they now have their own set of proposals on devolution.

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Strathclyde Commission: Scotland should have full powers over income tax

The Scottish Parliament should be handed full powers over income tax, according to a report commissioned by the Scottish Conservatives.

Scotland analysis: Fiscal policy and sustainability


This is the fourteenth paper in the Scotland analysis series and examines the outlook for Scotland’s public finances and the financial implications of independence for Scottish households and businesses.

Outlook for Scotland's Public Finances

The Outlook for Scotland’s Public Finances, published today, demonstrates that Scotland will start life as an independent country with strong and sustainable public finances – and by using the powers of independence to grow our economy, could be £5 billion per year better off by 2029-30.

On all key fiscal measures forecast by the Scottish Government, Scotland’s finances in 2016-17 will be similar to, or stronger than, both the UK and the G7 industrialised countries as a whole.

The Referendum on Separation for Scotland: Scotland's Membership of the EU

Scottish Affairs Committee - Twelfth Report

Today Scotland's interests in the European Union are represented by the UK which, as one of the largest Member States, has the voting power and leverage to influence decisions to the benefit of Scotland. In leaving the UK, a separate Scotland would lose this advantage.

Scotland’s Tax Future; Taxes Explained

ICAS has published tax paper "Scotland’s Tax Future; Taxes Explained", which seeks to inform voters on the importance of key tax and spending numbers at the centre of the independence debate and offers straightforward and objective explanations of current tax topics.

http://icas.org.uk/ScottishIndependence/

The final report of the Labour Party’s Devolution Commission, published yesterday, contains two main proposals on taxation. Firstly, that the Scottish Parliament’s powers over income taxation should be enhanced with the ability to: vary income tax rates by up to 15p in the pound, compared to the 10p that would be implemented in 2016 as a consequence of the Scotland Act 2012; make the Scottish income tax system more progressive (but not less) by allowing upward variation (only) in the higher rates of tax relative to the basic rate.

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Latest blogs

  • 18th May 2018

    Different political actors have responded to the decision by the Scottish Parliament to withhold its consent for the UK Government’s showpiece EU (Withdrawal) Bill in very different ways. Prof Nicola McEwen sifts the facts from the hyperbole and explains where we are and where we go from here.

  • 15th May 2018

    On 8 May the UK’s House of Lords passed an amendment to require the House of Commons to vote on remaining in the European Economic Area (EEA), the possibility of Britain adopting the so-called ‘Norway model’ is back on the agenda of British politics. Here the authors of Squaring the Circle on Brexit: Could the Norway Model Work?, John Erik Fossum and Hans Petter Graver, give some background to Norway’s relationship with the European Union and reveal the truth behind some common myths about the Norway model.

  • 4th May 2018

    The Sewel Convention has historically worked well, says Michael Keating, but Brexit will put it to the test.

  • 3rd May 2018

    Amendments to controversial Clause 11 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill were agreed in the House of Lords yesterday evening, following a deal between the UK and Welsh governments last week. Jack Sheldon and Mike Kenny explain the significance of this agreement for the UK as a whole and outline a number of unresolved issues it raises.

  • 2nd May 2018

    The hesitant progress of Brexit legislation through Westminster has provided parliament with an opportunity to show its teeth and, says Tobias Lock, it demonstrates that the legislature has bite as well as bark.

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