England

Professor Charlie Jeffery reflects on the key findings of the 2014 Future of England Survey as debate on the constitutional question – and UKIP’s rise – unfolds in England.

Scotland’s big question was resolved on 18 September 2014. Early the next morning David Cameron opened up the English question, announcing:

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Taking England Seriously: The New English Politics

The 2014 Future of England Survey discovers not only a distinct English identity but a strong and growing desire for England-wide solutions to English constitutional solutions. The survey of 3,705 adults in England found support for David Cameron's preferred option of English Votes for English Laws; however there was little confidence that the Tories or their leader would speak out for English interests.

Both England and Wales oppose Scottish Independence – but the English favour a harder line with Scotland

New research shows that while people in both England and Wales oppose Scottish independence, they have rather differing views about what should happen after the independence referendum on 18th September. People in England want a hard line to be taken with Scotland, whatever the outcome of the referendum. Those in Wales are inclined to a more conciliatory approach, particularly to an independent Scotland in the event of a Yes vote.

The English favour a hard line with Scotland – whatever the result of the Independence Referendum

New research shows that people in England want a hard line to be taken with Scotland, whatever the outcome of the independence referendum on 18th September. The views of English voters are not only starkly at odds with those of the Scottish Government regarding what should follow from a Yes vote. They also contradict the unionist parties about what should be the consequences of a No victory.

Historian Linda Colley rejects the idea that British disintegration is inevitable but says a new constitutional settlement is needed to bind the nations and people of the United Kingdom together, and to help clarify its relationship with Europe. The English, she argues, would benefit from having a parliament of their own.

Professor Colley was interviewed by Guy Lodge, co-editor of Juncture and an associate director at IPPR.

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  • 3rd May 2018

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