England

The government’s detailed proposals for introducing English Votes for English Laws (EVEL) into the House of Commons are a significant moment in our constitutional history, say Michael Kenny and Daniel Gover, but there is good reason to think that EVEL is unlikely to represent a sufficient answer to the English question.
 
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The introduction of English Votes for English Laws (EVEL) faces a problem, says Michael Keating, in that only a minority of English voters will ever have supported the laws in question. 
 
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The draft Cities and Local Government Devolution Bill has both strengths and weaknesses but whatever its merits, says Keith Shaw, it needs to be seen as the beginning rather than the end of the process. 
 
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Charlie Jeffery, Ailsa Henderson, Roger Scully, Daniel Wincott and Richard Wyn Jones discuss the referendum on the UK’s EU membership.

Charlie Jeffery and Ailsa Henderson (University of Edinburgh). Roger Scully, Daniel Wincott and Richard Wyn Jones (Cardiff University)

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Charlie Jeffery looks at the Conservatives conversion to EVEL and asks if it reflects genuine concerns about how England is governed or short-term tactical opportunism?

So now we have it confirmed. David Cameron and William Hague last Friday pledged the introduction of English Votes on English Laws (EVEL) within 100 days should the Conservatives win the general election. They did so to boot while launching a special election manifesto for English voters only, another first in this extraordinary election campaign.

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The election campaign has brought the issue of English attitudes towards their neighbours and the Union into sharp relief, with UKIP making much of socially conservative values. However, explains Michael Kenny, the reality is rather more complex.
 
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Latest blogs

  • 18th May 2018

    Different political actors have responded to the decision by the Scottish Parliament to withhold its consent for the UK Government’s showpiece EU (Withdrawal) Bill in very different ways. Prof Nicola McEwen sifts the facts from the hyperbole and explains where we are and where we go from here.

  • 15th May 2018

    On 8 May the UK’s House of Lords passed an amendment to require the House of Commons to vote on remaining in the European Economic Area (EEA), the possibility of Britain adopting the so-called ‘Norway model’ is back on the agenda of British politics. Here the authors of Squaring the Circle on Brexit: Could the Norway Model Work?, John Erik Fossum and Hans Petter Graver, give some background to Norway’s relationship with the European Union and reveal the truth behind some common myths about the Norway model.

  • 4th May 2018

    The Sewel Convention has historically worked well, says Michael Keating, but Brexit will put it to the test.

  • 3rd May 2018

    Amendments to controversial Clause 11 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill were agreed in the House of Lords yesterday evening, following a deal between the UK and Welsh governments last week. Jack Sheldon and Mike Kenny explain the significance of this agreement for the UK as a whole and outline a number of unresolved issues it raises.

  • 2nd May 2018

    The hesitant progress of Brexit legislation through Westminster has provided parliament with an opportunity to show its teeth and, says Tobias Lock, it demonstrates that the legislature has bite as well as bark.

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