England

The government’s detailed proposals for introducing English Votes for English Laws (EVEL) into the House of Commons are a significant moment in our constitutional history, say Michael Kenny and Daniel Gover, but there is good reason to think that EVEL is unlikely to represent a sufficient answer to the English question.
 
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The introduction of English Votes for English Laws (EVEL) faces a problem, says Michael Keating, in that only a minority of English voters will ever have supported the laws in question. 
 
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The draft Cities and Local Government Devolution Bill has both strengths and weaknesses but whatever its merits, says Keith Shaw, it needs to be seen as the beginning rather than the end of the process. 
 
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Charlie Jeffery, Ailsa Henderson, Roger Scully, Daniel Wincott and Richard Wyn Jones discuss the referendum on the UK’s EU membership.

Charlie Jeffery and Ailsa Henderson (University of Edinburgh). Roger Scully, Daniel Wincott and Richard Wyn Jones (Cardiff University)

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Charlie Jeffery looks at the Conservatives conversion to EVEL and asks if it reflects genuine concerns about how England is governed or short-term tactical opportunism?

So now we have it confirmed. David Cameron and William Hague last Friday pledged the introduction of English Votes on English Laws (EVEL) within 100 days should the Conservatives win the general election. They did so to boot while launching a special election manifesto for English voters only, another first in this extraordinary election campaign.

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The election campaign has brought the issue of English attitudes towards their neighbours and the Union into sharp relief, with UKIP making much of socially conservative values. However, explains Michael Kenny, the reality is rather more complex.
 
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