Economy

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In a guest blog, Frank Barry, Professor of International Business & Development at Trinity College Dublin, looks at the history of the Republic of Ireland’s economic policy and lessons for an independent Scotland.

Ireland’s separation from the United Kingdom in 1922 was achieved under very different circumstances from those prevailing today. Westminster had refused to accept the wishes of the Irish electorate as expressed in the 1918 General Election because of the consequences that the British government thought this would have had for the future of the Empire. 

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Oxford journal features ESRC teams’ economic work

The latest Oxford Review of Economic Policy features the work of ESRC Future of the UK and Scotland teams who have focused on the economic dimension of the independence debate.

Professor Ewart Keep of the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, at Oxford University, looks at the findings of the Scottish Government-commissioned review of workplace policies, chaired by Jim Mather, which were published on August 13th.

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David Eiser discusses the Scottish Economic Society and University of Stirling economists latest book which aims to bring together economic research that informs the debate, and presents it in a clear and succinct fashion.

It has been another week where economic issues have been at the fore of the independence debate, including the acknowledgment for the first time by the Bank of England Governor Mark Carney that the central bank has been contingency planning for the outcome of the referendum.

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This week, we are highlighting the contributions of our fellows to Scotland's Decision: 16 Questions to think about for the referendum on 18 September.  Today’s topic is prospects for business and competition.

The book is available as a free download.

Our experts look at two questions under this heading:

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Scotland has limited lender of last resort options in an informal currency union

If an independent Scotland chooses an informal currency union (called ‘dollarization’ or 'sterlingization') as Plan B, its financial institutions cannot be sure they will have access to emergency liquidity in the next financial crisis. This is likely to have important consequences for Scotland’s financial sector, and therefore its capacity to export financial services, its new balance of payments and general economic prosperity.   

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