Economy

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With just a week of political campaigning left, the outcome of the referendum has never looked less certain. Perhaps the only safe bet is that however Scotland votes on September 18th, there will be a transfer of powers and responsibilities from Westminster to Edinburgh whether through independence or significant further devolution as promised by the Unionist parties. Any change to the balance of power and function between Whitehall and Holyrood will have repercussions for both the Scottish Government and UK departments.

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The economic outlook has been a central part of the referendum the debate, and currency, business prospects, and job creation all remain subjects of focus.

Today on the blog, David Bell discusses the employment sector in Scotland. He notes that since the creation of the Scottish Parliament, jobs growth in Scotland has been good by international standards but that employment hasn’t grown faster in Scotland than in the UK as a whole.

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In a blog posted at Scottish Fiscal and Economic Studies, David Bell discusses job growth and the Scottish economy.

The number of jobs in Scotland has become another bone of contention in the referendum campaign. Let’s look at the facts.

The number of jobs in the Scottish economy has increased by 13.5 per cent since 1999, when the Scottish Parliament was established. The level of employment in Scotland is now 2.6 million, the highest level ever recorded.

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  • 20th July 2018

    Richard Parry reviews a fast-evolving situation as the march of time and need to reconcile rhetoric and practicality constrain policy-makers

  • 13th July 2018

    The White Paper published this week talks about the UK Government making ‘sovereign decisions’ to adopt European rules but, as we know from the experience of Norway and Switzerland, this can be an illusory sovereignty when the costs of deviating from the rules is exclusion from the single market or European programmes. CCC Director Professor Michael Keating looks at whether the UK is ready for this kind of deal.

  • 12th July 2018

    Last week the government released its fisheries white paper. While most of the fisheries and Brexit debate centres on quotas and access to waters, there is also an important devolution dimension. Brexit already has profound consequences for the UK’s devolution settlement and fisheries policy is one example of this. So, in addition to communicating its overall vision for post-Brexit fisheries policy, the white paper was also an opportunity for the government to set out how it would see that policy working in the devolved UK.

  • 4th July 2018

    At the same time as Parliament prepares to ‘take back control’ from Brussels, the executive is in fact accruing to itself further control over the legislative process. CCC Fellow Professor Stephen Tierney addresses a number of trends – only some of which are a direct consequence of the unique circumstances of Brexit – which suggest a deeper realignment of institutional power within the constitution and a consequent diminution of Parliament’s legislative power.

  • 27th June 2018

    Faced with a choice between splitting her Cabinet into winners and losers, Theresa May has sought to keep the Brexit crap game going. She does this by avoiding betting on either a hard or soft Brexit. Professor Richard Rose of Strathclyde looks at the high stakes outcomes facing the Prime Minister. .

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