Economy

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With just a week of political campaigning left, the outcome of the referendum has never looked less certain. Perhaps the only safe bet is that however Scotland votes on September 18th, there will be a transfer of powers and responsibilities from Westminster to Edinburgh whether through independence or significant further devolution as promised by the Unionist parties. Any change to the balance of power and function between Whitehall and Holyrood will have repercussions for both the Scottish Government and UK departments.

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The economic outlook has been a central part of the referendum the debate, and currency, business prospects, and job creation all remain subjects of focus.

Today on the blog, David Bell discusses the employment sector in Scotland. He notes that since the creation of the Scottish Parliament, jobs growth in Scotland has been good by international standards but that employment hasn’t grown faster in Scotland than in the UK as a whole.

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In a blog posted at Scottish Fiscal and Economic Studies, David Bell discusses job growth and the Scottish economy.

The number of jobs in Scotland has become another bone of contention in the referendum campaign. Let’s look at the facts.

The number of jobs in the Scottish economy has increased by 13.5 per cent since 1999, when the Scottish Parliament was established. The level of employment in Scotland is now 2.6 million, the highest level ever recorded.

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Latest blogs

  • 16th November 2018

    What has been presented as an endgame is really just the beginning of the process and what is being described as the 'transition' or 'implementation' period, says Michael Keating, is really the time in which the real negotiation of what Brexit means will take place.

  • 15th November 2018

    With the politics of the process changing almost by the minute, Richard Parry assesses the ‘stable text’ of the Brexit agreement.

  • 15th November 2018

    As the DUP position shifts and Threatens Theresa May's working majority, Jonathan Evershed assesses the scope and limits of Unionist resistance to the Brexit backstop.

  • 15th November 2018

    Professor Michael Kenny and Jack Sheldon discuss a new report from the Centre on Constitutional Change and the Bennett Institute offering a comprehensive analysis of the weaknesses that bedevil the machinery for relations between the UK government and the devolved governments in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Over the coming weeks, we will highlight some of the findings and recommendations.

  • 13th November 2018

    Experts from the Universities of Edinburgh and Cambridge have called for far-reaching reforms to the UK’s system of intergovernmental relations (IGR). The report, Reforming Intergovernmental Relations in the United Kingdom, provides the framework for a new system of intergovernmental machinery built around principles of respect, transparency and accountability.

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