Devolution Proposals

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Have your say – Submitting ideas, views and proposals to The Smith Commission

Lord Smith has been tasked with convening cross-party talks to produce, by 30 November 2014, Heads of Agreement with recommendations for further devolution of powers to strengthen the Scottish Parliament within the UK. As part of that, Lord Smith wants to hear from you about your views on what could be devolved.

The Smith Commission is accepting party proposals regarding what further devolution will look like for Scotland. Craig McAngus, Research Fellow at the Centre on Constitutional Change, argues that the SNP will come out of the process as the likely winners. They will be able to point to their proposals as being the will of the Scottish people, while attacking the other parties (mainly Labour) for selling Scotland constitutionally short.

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Scottish constitutional preferences have long been split (at least) three ways - between those who supported independence, those who supported the constitutional status quo, and those who wanted a stronger Scottish Parliament within the UK – let’s call them the devo-maxers. The promise this week of speedy legislation to bring new powers to the Scottish Parliament is intended to prevent the devo maxers drifting in ever greater numbers towards a yes vote.

An Agreement to Agree – the new timetable

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Devolution promises could be game-changer, finds BES

Many Scots want more devolution, but think those additional powers will be achieved without independence, according to new data released by the British Election Study (BES).

The findings by Professor Ed Fieldhouse from The University of Manchester, who Co-directs the BES, reveal that half of voters think more powers will be achieved, even if Scotland votes ‘No’.

The research is published three-months to referendum polling day.

As the Scottish referendum campaign moves into the final three months the pro Union parties have emphasised their commitment to more devolution should Scotland choose to remain in the Union. The Conservatives recently outlined plans to devolve additional tax raising powers to the Scottish Parliament, allowing it to raise 40% of the money it spends.

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