Constitution

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It is a peculiar feature of devolution in the United Kingdom that each nation is treated differently, with its own settlement geared to local political demands.
 
Foreign observers look with puzzlement, seeing it as British pragmatism taken to extremes.
 
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Latest Institute for Government Report - Westminster in an age of minorities

The UK once had a highly majoritarian political system, with power alternating between two dominant parties. This has now changed. The vote share of the two large parties has declined dramatically – 35% is now regarded as a winning rather than a losing vote share. This makes single-party majorities less likely (though not impossible) to achieve as greater space is created for smaller parties to establish themselves in the House of Commons.

Scottish Referendum Study in the media

The most recent findings of the Scottish Referendum Study were published on Friday. The team, which includes academics from the universities of Edinburgh, Glasgow and Essex, has been focussing on who voted which way and why they did so.

House of Lords Constitution Committee’s report - Proposals for the devolution of further powers to Scotland

The publication last week of the House of Lords Constitution Committee’s report into the Proposals for the devolution of further powers to Scotland was widely reported in the media. However, you could be forgiven for having missed the role of academics in helping the committee reached its conclusion unless you read the report in full.

The most recent results of the Scottish Referendum Study have been widely discussed in the media. The research invetigated what motivated Scots to vote Yes or No in September's referemdum. We'll be following up with a blog outlining the significance of the results and will post the video of the launch of the report once it is avauilable. For now, here are the findings as they have been released to the media. 

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Latest blogs

  • 18th May 2018

    Different political actors have responded to the decision by the Scottish Parliament to withhold its consent for the UK Government’s showpiece EU (Withdrawal) Bill in very different ways. Prof Nicola McEwen sifts the facts from the hyperbole and explains where we are and where we go from here.

  • 15th May 2018

    On 8 May the UK’s House of Lords passed an amendment to require the House of Commons to vote on remaining in the European Economic Area (EEA), the possibility of Britain adopting the so-called ‘Norway model’ is back on the agenda of British politics. Here the authors of Squaring the Circle on Brexit: Could the Norway Model Work?, John Erik Fossum and Hans Petter Graver, give some background to Norway’s relationship with the European Union and reveal the truth behind some common myths about the Norway model.

  • 4th May 2018

    The Sewel Convention has historically worked well, says Michael Keating, but Brexit will put it to the test.

  • 3rd May 2018

    Amendments to controversial Clause 11 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill were agreed in the House of Lords yesterday evening, following a deal between the UK and Welsh governments last week. Jack Sheldon and Mike Kenny explain the significance of this agreement for the UK as a whole and outline a number of unresolved issues it raises.

  • 2nd May 2018

    The hesitant progress of Brexit legislation through Westminster has provided parliament with an opportunity to show its teeth and, says Tobias Lock, it demonstrates that the legislature has bite as well as bark.

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