Working papers

It has taken the Scottish Conservatives a long time to adjust to life in post-devolution Scotland. In particular, one question has overshadowed and constrained the party’s thinking: what is the appropriate Conservative response to the Scottish Parliament?

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National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Paper - 12 September 2014

Two points are clear from the Scottish referendum debate. First, there are certain capabilities which the UK provides that are invaluable to all constituent nations.

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Innogen working paper - August 2014
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CREID Working Paper, Elisabet Weedon - June 2014

This paper presents the views of 18 individuals from universities and university-related organisations in the rest of the UK and the Republic of Ireland, and complements working paper 5, which deals with Scottish key informants.

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CREID Working Paper, Linda Croxford and David Raffe - June 2014

About 7% of full-time undergraduate students domiciled in the UK move to another home country of the UK to study. This proportion varies widely across the four home countries, from less than one in twenty English-domiciled students to around one in three from Wales and NorthernIreland.

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CREID Working Paper, Sarah Minty - June 2014

This working paper presents findings from research undertaken with young people as part of the ESRC project ‘Higher Education in Scotland, the devolution settlement and the referendum on independence’. Interviews were conducted with 148 young people aged 14 to 19.

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CREID Working Paper, Sheila Riddell - June 2014

This working paper draws on findings from an ESRC-funded project entitled Higher Education in Scotland, the Devolution Settlement and the Referendum on Independence, conducted by researchers at the University of Edinburgh between March 2013 and July 2014.

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Paper prepared for annual conference of the Political Studies Association 14-­‐16 April 2014, Manchester

(Work in progress–please do not cite without permission)


Abstract

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