Reports & Briefings

21 February 2014, ESRC Scottish Centre on Constitutional Change

Professor Paul Cairney and Emily St Denny of University of Stirling and ESRC Scottish Centre on Constitutional Change outline the decision-making processes in prevention policy in a report to the Scottish Government.

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14 February 2014, Centre for Population Change
Attracting and retaining migrants has been positioned as a key driver of population and economic growth in Scotland (Scottish Government, 2011).
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14 February 2014, Centre for Population Change

The outcome of the 2014 Scottish referendum on the constitutional future of the United Kingdom (UK) may have noticeable impact on future migration to and from Scotland.

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14 February 2014, Centre for Population Change

Migration to and from Scotland could potentially be affected by the outcome of the 2014 Scottish referendum on the constitutional future of the United Kingdom.

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14 February 2014, Centre for Population Change

This briefing paper examines Scottish employers’ and industry representatives’ views on current UK immigration policies, and situates these perspectives within the context of the constitutional change debate.

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10 February 2014, Migration Observatory

The first detailed analysis of Scottish public opinion about immigration shows that Scotland has significantly lower levels of concern about immigration than England and Wales, but also that Scots’ views on the subject are strongly associated with their voting intentions in the referendum.

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29 January 2014, ESRC Scottish Centre on Constitutional Change

Briefing by Michael Keating on 29 January 2014 for Scottish Parliament Economy, Energy and Tourism Committee Inquiry into Scotland’s Economic Future Post-2014

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21 January 2014, ESRC Centre for Population Change

In a report for the ESRC Centre for Population Change Helen Packwood and Allan Findlay use the 2011 UK Census to explore the diverse immigration picture in the UK.

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21 January 2014, ESRC

David Comerford and David Eiser of the University of Stirling discuss these questions in the context of the debate around the Scottish independence referendum, in which inequality has played a prominent role, and ask whether independence, further devolution, or simply different policies under the

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Scottish Parliament Written Submission, 16 January 2014

In this written submission for the Scottish Parliament, Professor Michael Keating, Dr Nicola McEwen and Malcolm Harvey provide evidence about the role of small states in the European Union.

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