Reports & Briefings

As the Scotland Bill continues its journey through Westminster, Prof Nicola McEwen addressed a recent public meeting discussing its progress and implications. These are the slides from that event, organised in association with Democracy Matters and the ESRC. 

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This paper was first published in two parts on the UK Constitutional Law Association's website on 2 & 3 December, 2015.

On 20 October 2015, the UK Government published the draft Wales Bill. The overall purpose of the Bill is to implement the UK Government’s St David’s Day “Agreement” of February 2015 in order to establish a clear and lasting devolution settlement for Wales.

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Devolution (Further Powers) Committee Report - November 2015

The Committee has published a short, accessible Guide to Devolution in Scotland, containing information and facts and figures on devolution to date and the key features of the Scotland Bill 2015-16.

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Published with the Institute for Fiscal Studies, 20 November 2015
The Scotland Bill, currently making its way through the Houses of Parliament, will transfer a range of tax and spending powers from Westminster to the Scottish Parliament. At the same time, an adjustment will have to be made to Scotland’s block grant funding from Westminster.
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This paper is published by the IRPP, 18 November 2015
Abstract
 
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This current reform is also likely to have wider constitutional implications. It is possible that it will in time lead to pressure for a more substantive form of EVEL, particularly if further powers are devolved to other parts of the UK. 

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6 October 2015

As part of the Committee’s scrutiny of inter-governmental relations, the Committee commissioned external research of the legislative oversight of inter-governmental relations in other jurisdictions.

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October 2015

The Constitution Committee of the House of Lords is currently conducting an inquiry into the impact of devolution on the UK, what binds the constituent parts together and how the Union might be strengthened and reinforced.

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The Hunter Foundation

A year on from the independence referendum, David Bell considers what's happened since, particularly in terms of the economy and economic powers. He also considers where Scotland would be now had the vote gone the other way. 

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The Scotland Bill contains many new powers for the Scottish Government but those relating to welfare have been the focus of particular interest. Much has been said about how they might be changed or improved to develop a distinctively Scottish approach to social security.
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