Reports & Briefings

Study: Uncertain Post-Brexit Future for Farmers in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland 
 
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September 2017

The decision of the United Kingdom to leave the European Union has major consequences for the transport, logistics and supply chain sector.

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Neuropolitics Research Lab - Report June 2017

This work is produced by researchers at the Neuropolitics Research Lab, School of Social and Political Science and the School of Informatics at the University of Edinburgh.

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David Bell, Stirling Management School - February 2017

Since the EU referendum, the post-Brexit future for agricultural, regional and rural policies in the UK have been hotly debated. Few of these debates have taken account of the role of the devolved governments in relation to these policies.

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Second Report on the 2016-17 Fiscal Framework Negotiations for Wales - December 2016

This is the second in a series of reports by researchers from Cardiff University’s Wales Governance Centre and the Institute for Fiscal Studies on the 2016-17 Fiscal Framework Negotiations for Wales.

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Friends of Europe Discussion Paper by Kirsty Hughes - Winter 2016

On 23 June, the UK as a whole voted to leave the EU, but the majority of voters in Scotland opted for Remain. Scotland now faces a choice, and soon: 'hard Brexit' within the UK, independence in the EU, or a special deal that gives Scotland individual membership of the single market.

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By Daniel Gover and Michael Kenny, November 2016

Recent political developments have focused attention on the ‘English Question’.

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PSA and the UK in a Changing Europe - 2 November 2016

The PSA and the UK in a Changing Europe have today (2 November 2016) launched a comprehensive report looking at the processes and challenges ahead in the UK's withdrawal from the EU.

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Summary: This document explains how Northern Ireland and Scotland should and could stay within the European Union while remaining inside the United Kingdom; why this proposal need not prevent and may in fact facilitate England and Wales in leaving the EU; and why this compromise proposal is in
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Latest blogs

  • 20th July 2018

    Richard Parry reviews a fast-evolving situation as the march of time and need to reconcile rhetoric and practicality constrain policy-makers

  • 13th July 2018

    The White Paper published this week talks about the UK Government making ‘sovereign decisions’ to adopt European rules but, as we know from the experience of Norway and Switzerland, this can be an illusory sovereignty when the costs of deviating from the rules is exclusion from the single market or European programmes. CCC Director Professor Michael Keating looks at whether the UK is ready for this kind of deal.

  • 12th July 2018

    Last week the government released its fisheries white paper. While most of the fisheries and Brexit debate centres on quotas and access to waters, there is also an important devolution dimension. Brexit already has profound consequences for the UK’s devolution settlement and fisheries policy is one example of this. So, in addition to communicating its overall vision for post-Brexit fisheries policy, the white paper was also an opportunity for the government to set out how it would see that policy working in the devolved UK.

  • 4th July 2018

    At the same time as Parliament prepares to ‘take back control’ from Brussels, the executive is in fact accruing to itself further control over the legislative process. CCC Fellow Professor Stephen Tierney addresses a number of trends – only some of which are a direct consequence of the unique circumstances of Brexit – which suggest a deeper realignment of institutional power within the constitution and a consequent diminution of Parliament’s legislative power.

  • 27th June 2018

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