Books & Articles

Xosé M. Núñez Seixas and Eric Storm eds., Regionalism and Modern Europe: Identity Construction and Movements from 1890 to the Present Day (London: Bloomsbury 2019) paperback, hardback and e-book.

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Over the last twenty years, the United Kingdom has undergone a programme of constitutional reform embedded in membership of the European Union (EU). Devolved legislatures and governments have been established in different forms in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

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April 2018 - Journal of Common Market Studies

Authors: Daniel Cetrà and Robert Liñeira

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April 2018 - Comparative Political Economy series

The implications of Brexit for Northern Ireland are profound, given its history and geographical position as a land border with the European Union.

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September 2017 - Palgrave Macmillan

M. Keating, G. Laforest (Eds.) - Constitutional Politics and the Territorial Question in Canada and the United Kingdom

Federalism and Devolution Compared

Series: Comparative Territorial Politics

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March 2017 - Edinburgh University Press

How can Scotland use its new and existing powers to create a brighter economic and social future?

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February 2017 - Oxford University Press

On 18 September 2014, Scotland held a referendum on the question: Should Scotland be an independent country?

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Oxford University Press - The Scottish Independence Referendum
Edited by Aileen McHarg, Tom Mullen, Alan Page, and Neil Walker
  • Provides an essential, one-stop resource for academics, students, and all others who are interested in learning about the referendum and its aftermath
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The Political Quarterly, Volume 87, Issue 2

In the 1975 referendum England provided the strongest support for European integration, with a much smaller margin for membership in Scotland and Northern Ireland. By 2015 the rank order of ‘national’ attitudes to European integration had reversed.

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Latest blogs

  • 22nd January 2019

    The UK is increasingly polarised by Brexit identities and they seem to have become stronger than party identities, a new academic report finds. Only one in 16 people did not have a Brexit identity, while more than one in five said they had no party identity. Sir John Curtice’s latest analysis of public opinion on a further referendum finds there has been no decisive shift in favour of another referendum. The report, Brexit and public opinion 2019, by The UK in a Changing Europe, provides an authoritative, comprehensive and up-to-date guide to public opinion on each of the key issues around Brexit. CCC Fellow, Dr Coree Brown Swan contributed a chapter on "the SNP, Brexit and the politics of independence"

  • 22nd January 2019

    In the papers accompanying the draft Environment (Principles and Governance) Bill published at the end of 2018, the UK Government says that it is “exploring opportunities to co-design the final proposals with the devolved administrations.” There are clear benefits in having strong co-operation and collaboration across the UK in the oversight of our environmental law and performance. Yet the challenge of finding a way forward in terms of working together is substantial since each part of the UK is in a different position at present. Given where things stand today, it may be better to accept that a good resolution is not possible immediately and to revisit the issue at a later stage - so long as there is a strong commitment to return and not allow interim arrangements to become fixed. Colin Reid, Professor of Environmental Law at the University of Dundee examines the issues.

  • 17th January 2019

    Richard Parry assesses a memorable day in UK parliamentary history as the Commons splits 432-202 on 15 January 2019 against the Government's recommended Brexit route. It was the most dramatic night at Westminster since the Labour government’s defeat on a confidence motion in 1979.

  • 17th January 2019

    What is the Irish government’s Brexit wish-list? The suggestion that Irish unity, as opposed to safeguarding political and economic stability, is the foremost concern of the Irish government is to misunderstand and misrepresent the motivations of this key Brexit stakeholder, writes Mary C. Murphy (University College Cork).

  • 17th January 2019

    Brexit is in trouble but not because of the Irish backstop, argues the CCC's Michael Keating.

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