Blogs & news

5th November 2018
post by Stephen Tierney

One of the areas of devolved competence that may be affected significantly by Brexit is Justice and Home Affairs (JHA). In this blog post, Professor Stephen Tierney explores the repatriation of JHA competences and the implications for devolution. This coincides with the publication of a new research briefing by Tierney and Remond, produced as part of a UK in a Changing Europe project.

30th October 2018
post by Stephen Tierney

The Northern Ireland (Executive Formation and Exercise of Functions) Bill, which arrives in the House of Lords today, is set to be enacted by way of fast-track legislative procedure this week.

29th October 2018
post by Greg Davies

In the aftermath of the most recent EU Council meeting, the prospect of the UK’s exit from the European Union without a withdrawal agreement looms larger than ever. Greg Davies suggests that this is a test for intergovernmental relations between Cardiff and Westminster and for the wider territorial constitution.

24th October 2018
post by Michael Keating

The recent introduction of the bill for an Act of Union into the House of Lords is a welcome addition to the debate on the future of Unionism that has been rumbling on since the devolution legislation of 1999 but, says Michael Keating, it contains several problems that will be familiar to those who have followed this debate.

24th October 2018
post by Centre on Const...

Keeping the Irish border open after Brexit is one of the key challenges that the UK and EU negotiation teams currently face.

19th October 2018
post by Michael Keating

Proposed revisions to the Basque Statute of Autonomy have revealed underlying tensions but the fault lines are not where an outside observer might assume they would be. They are fundamental and political and, explains Michael Keating, unlikely to be resolved by technocratic debate.

16th October 2018
post by Patrick Utz

Bavaria’s long-dominant party, the conservative Christian Social Union (CSU), has reached its worst election result in 60 years. As well as causing a headache for Angela Merkel, argues Patrick Utz, this political earthquake reveals Bavaria’s predicament between regionalism and populism,.

15th October 2018
post by Richard Parry

As the buildup to the EU Council meeting reaches fever pitch, Richard Parry explains that deals at dawn may work in Brussels but they don't always play to the home crowd.

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Latest blogs

  • 18th December 2018

    Aileen McHarg looks at last week’s decision by the Supreme Court in the UK Withdrawal from the European Union (Legal Continuity) (Scotland) Bill reference which demonstrates both the strength and the weakness of Holyrood as a legislature.

  • 17th December 2018

    The Supreme Court's ruling on the Scottish Continuity Bill gave both sides something but acknowledged that the vast bulk of the Bill was within Holyrood's competence at the time it was passed however, suggests Sionaidh Douglas-Scott, the strong feeling that devolved interests are not taken seriously highlights underlying fractures within the Union.

  • 14th December 2018

    Disagreements about the border between Northern Ireland and Ireland are about more than practical considerations of where customs checks should be performed, says Michael Keating.

  • 14th December 2018

    Derek MacKay’s third budget of this parliamentary session was doomed to be overshadowed by events at Westminster.

  • 12th December 2018

    Although the N-VA has insisted it left the Belgian government to pursue ’principled opposition’ those principle are, says Coree Brown Swan, at the very least informed by a strategy that allows it to maintain policy influence from outside government while countering the electoral threat posed by a resurgent Vlaams Belang.

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