Blogs & news

19th November 2018
post by Nicola McEwen

Disagreements between the UK, Welsh and Scottish Governments are about more than inter-party rivalry, says Nicola McEwen, they reflect a very real disagreement about how policy can be made - and by whom.

16th November 2018
post by Michael Keating

What has been presented as an endgame is really just the beginning of the process and what is being described as the 'transition' or 'implementation' period, says Michael Keating, is really the time in which the real negotiation of what Brexit means will take place.

15th November 2018
post by Richard Parry

With the politics of the process changing almost by the minute, Richard Parry assesses the ‘stable text’ of the Brexit agreement.

15th November 2018
post by Jonathan Evershed

As the DUP position shifts and Threatens Theresa May's working majority, Jonathan Evershed assesses the scope and limits of Unionist resistance to the Brexit backstop.

15th November 2018
post by Michael Kenny

Professor Michael Kenny and Jack Sheldon discuss a new report from the Centre on Constitutional Change and the Bennett Institute offering a comprehensive analysis of the weaknesses that bedevil the machinery for relations between the UK government and the devolved governments in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Over the coming weeks, we will highlight some of the findings and recommendations.

13th November 2018
post by Centre on Const...

Experts from the Universities of Edinburgh and Cambridge have called for far-reaching reforms to the UK’s system of intergovernmental relations (IGR). The report, Reforming Intergovernmental Relations in the United Kingdom, provides the framework for a new system of intergovernmental machinery built around principles of respect, transparency and accountability.

13th November 2018
post by Centre on Const...

The Centre on Constitutional Change, along with the Bennett Institute for Public Policy, has issued a report on the state of intergovernmental relations in the UK. We will be issuing blogs and other resources relating to this report over the coming weeks but this post outlines our key recommendations.

6th November 2018
post by Centre on Const...

One of the less anticipated features of Brexit has been the nature of the disputes between the UK Government and the governments of Scotland and Wales. In this guest blog, Mark Sandford and Cathy Gormley-Heenan from the Parliament and Constitution Centre of the House of Commons Library, discuss devolution, and how Brexit has impacted intergovernmental relations between the devolved governments.

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Latest blogs

  • 18th December 2018

    Aileen McHarg looks at last week’s decision by the Supreme Court in the UK Withdrawal from the European Union (Legal Continuity) (Scotland) Bill reference which demonstrates both the strength and the weakness of Holyrood as a legislature.

  • 17th December 2018

    The Supreme Court's ruling on the Scottish Continuity Bill gave both sides something but acknowledged that the vast bulk of the Bill was within Holyrood's competence at the time it was passed however, suggests Sionaidh Douglas-Scott, the strong feeling that devolved interests are not taken seriously highlights underlying fractures within the Union.

  • 14th December 2018

    Disagreements about the border between Northern Ireland and Ireland are about more than practical considerations of where customs checks should be performed, says Michael Keating.

  • 14th December 2018

    Derek MacKay’s third budget of this parliamentary session was doomed to be overshadowed by events at Westminster.

  • 12th December 2018

    Although the N-VA has insisted it left the Belgian government to pursue ’principled opposition’ those principle are, says Coree Brown Swan, at the very least informed by a strategy that allows it to maintain policy influence from outside government while countering the electoral threat posed by a resurgent Vlaams Belang.

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