Blogs & news

12th October 2017
post by Richard Parry

Richard Parry discusses the impact of three speeches in Florence, Glasgow and Barcelona.

11th October 2017
post by Luis Moreno

It is time to listen to those proposals for a path forward that lie between independence and the status quo, says Professor Luis Moreno.

4th October 2017
post by Daniel Cetrà

Daniel Cetrà on how the main political consequence of Sunday’s events is that the Spanish Government has lost the battle of legitimacy in Catalonia.

2nd October 2017
post by Michael Keating

Although questions of what national self-determination means and how it can be exercised have changed over time, says Michael Keating, the response of the Spanish authorities to the 2017 Catalan referendum breaches the modern, democratic, notion of the right to decide.

29th September 2017
Guest post by Centre on Const...

Amidst the current, noisy, political debate about ‘bonanzas’ and ‘power grabs’ there is some measure of consensus between the UK and Scottish Governments as regards the need for (and value of) UK-wide ‘common frameworks’ post-Brexit, especially in relation to the functioning of markets within the UK. However, as Shepherd and Wedderburn's Gordon Downie explains, what might be described as the opening negotiating positions of the UK and Scottish Governments reveal wide differences on the scope and content of these new common frameworks, and on the constitutional mechanics that should underpin them.

21st September 2017
post by Stephen Tierney

In an interim report on the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill, the House of Lords Constitution Committee has said that the “political, legal and constitutional significance of the Bill is unparalleled”. In this post, Mark Elliott and Stephen Tierney examine the main points made in the report and comment on the key issues raised by it.

21st September 2017
post by Michael Kenny

Any future Labour government would need to confront EVEL, says Prof Michael Kenny, not least because many of Jeremy Corbyn's totemic policies relate only to England.

21st September 2017
post by Michael Keating

Neither the Spanish nor Catalan government's have the mandate or the room for manoeuvre that would allow them to break the current impasse, says Michael Keating.


Latest blogs

  • 22nd March 2018

    The devolved legislatures’ ‘continuity’ legislation prepares their statute books for Brexit in the event of an ongoing impasse with the UK Government over the so-called ‘power grab’ in the EU Withdrawal Bill. Professor Nicola McEwen suggests these ongoing discussions and debates provide insight into the challenges and opportunities likely to shape ongoing intergovernmental relationships.

  • 22nd March 2018

    Two decades have passed since there was last a serious consideration of how the UK uses referendums. In the light of the Referendums of recent years, our colleagues at the Constitution Unit at UCL established the Independent Commission on Referendums. Ahead of a public event in Edinburgh, the Commission's research director, Dr Alan Renwick, explains its terms of reference.

  • 9th March 2018

    Stephen Hornsby, a partner at Goodman Derrick LLP, comments on Michael Keating's recent paper on the policy making implications of Brexit for agriculture in the UK.

  • 9th March 2018

    In response to the apparent surge in support for Corsican nationalists, President Macron has made it clear that Corsica will not be allowed to distinguish itself further from the rest of France. However, says Dr Alexendra Remond, support for autonomy may be symptomatic more of disenchantment with the status quo than of growing Corsican nationalism.

  • 2nd March 2018

    With little enough fanfare, Cabinet Office Minister David Liddington MP set out how Britain will operate post-Brexit. Prof Michael Kenny and Jack Sheldon consider what he had to say.

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