Stephen Tierney

Stephen Tierney's picture
Professor
Stephen
Tierney
Organisation: 
University of Edinburgh
Phone Number: 
+44 (0)131-650-2070
Email Address: 
Biography: 

There are significant gaps in the information available to policymakers and citizens at this crucial constitutional moment for Scotland. Stephen Tierney has been engaged in advising the Scottish Parliament on the Referendum Bill, applying his research on international referendum practice to help ensure that the process in 2014 is properly democratic. Through the Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law he has also been addressing the substantive issues at stake, including what independence would mean for the constitution of Scotland, and the constitutional process that would likely follow in the event of a Yes vote. Other work has been on the European and International law issues that would need to be addressed were Scotland to become independent. See the paper: Legal Issues Surrounding the Referendum on Independence for Scotland.

A key issue is to help inform the public and in particular young voters. To that end Tierney’s project website offers quizzes aimed at young people, testing their knowledge of the UK and Scottish constitutional systems and, in due course, of the independence issue itself http://www.scottishindependenceaudit.ed.ac.uk/quizzes

Project Job Role: 
Relationships beyond Scotland, Centre on Constitutional Change

History

Blog
View recent blog entries
Member for
4 years 9 months

Posts by this author:

The Smith proposals are radical: the devolution of extensive tax and welfare powers will make Scotland one of the most autonomous regions in Western Europe. It seems that only a federal system can manage these changes while also giving Scotland a continuing stake in the Union. Otherwise, as the Scot... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Stephen Tierney asks is it feasible to address additional powers for the Scottish Parliament alone without also considering the knock-on consequences for the entire country? This post was originally posted on The United Kingdom Constitutional Law Association (UKCLA) blog. In the month of November th... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Stephen Tierney discusses how the Scottish referendum has not changed the borders of the UK but it has challenged the boundaries of our imagination. This post originally appeared on UK Constitutional Law Association Only 45% of Scots said yes to independent statehood, but a massive majority said yes... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Stephen Tierney and Katie Boyle Executive Summary This paper addresses the road to membership of the European Union for an independent Scotland. The UK Government and Scottish Government each undertook in the Edinburgh Agreement of 15 October 2012 to respect the result of the referendum of 18 Sep... Read more
Post type: Publication
Stephen Tierney and Katie Boyle Today we publish a paper which is the outcome of an Economic and Social Research Council research project exploring the legal issues surrounding membership of the European Union for an independent Scotland. We conclude that: There are strong reasons to believe that i... Read more
Post type: News Article
On 16 June the Scottish Government unveiled its Scottish Independence Bill in an address by Nicola Sturgeon, Deputy First Minister of Scotland, to the Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law. The referendum on independence for Scotland will be held on 18 September this year and commentators have bee... Read more
Post type: Publication
The framework for human rights protection contained in the Scottish Government’s recent  publication, the Scottish Independence Bill: A Consultation on an Interim Constitution for Scotland (see Boyle, Tierney and McHarg) is notable in promising a more robust form of legal protection for fundamental... Read more
Post type: Publication
Stephen Tierney reflects on the forthcoming draft independence bill and the constitutional implications. Later this month we expect that the Scottish Government will publish for consultation a draft Scottish Independence Bill. This would be introduced into the Scottish Parliament following a Yes vot... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The sixteen week ‘campaign period’ has begun, leading up to the vote on 18 September. In this period the two main campaign groups, Yes Scotland and Better Together, as well as the political parties in Scotland, are subject to tight spending controls.  These rules are legally binding and any breach i... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Stephen Tierney analyses proposals to introduce an interim constitution in the event of a yes vote, concluding that the referendum embodies the spirit of vernacular politics, and a constitution which explicitly outlines policies, could challenge this spirit. This piece was originally published by th... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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Latest blogs

  • 25th April 2018

    Mary C. Murphy offers a detailed and in-depth analysis of Northern Ireland’s relationship with the EU, the role the EU has played in rebuilding the region after the Troubles, and the challenges and opportunities that Brexit might offer Northern Ireland in terms of its fragile politics and economy.

  • 25th April 2018

    The path being pursued by the DUP in Brexit, says Jonathan Evershed, is not so far from the mainstream of Unionist opinion.

  • 24th April 2018

    Antonia Ruiz, CCC visitor, looks at the rise of the populist radical right in Europe. She stresses that it's a topic that worries citizens, journalists, political elites and scholars alike.

  • 24th April 2018

    The promise of ‘change’ was key for the Austrian Christian democrats’ landslide victory in last year’s general elections. Recent sub-state elections, however, have perpetuated the influence of incumbent governors – and their power to veto reforms of Austria’s federal system. In light of current electoral dynamics, Patrick Utz analyses the (limited) potential for federal reforms in Austria.

  • 17th April 2018

    Richard Parry discusses the interacting policies on devolution and Brexit in the current impasse between UK and devolved governments.

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