Richard Wyn Jones

Richard Wyn Jones's picture
Professor
Richard
Wyn Jones
Job Title: 
Professor of Politics
Organisation: 
Cardiff University
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Richard Wyn Jones joined the staff of Cardiff University in February 2009 as Director of the Wales Governance, having previously worked as Professor of Welsh Politics and founding Director of the Institute of Welsh Politics at the Department of International Politics, Aberystwyth University. He has written extensively on contemporary Welsh politics, devolved politics in the UK and nationalism. In addition, Richard was one of the founders of Critical Security Studies.

Richard is a regular and widely respected broadcaster, commentating on Welsh politics in both Welsh and English for the BBC in Wales and across the UK. He has also presented two TV series and is a regular columnist for the Welsh language current affairs magazine Barn.

Project Job Role: 
Professor of Politics

History

Blog
View recent blog entries
Member for
4 years 3 months

Posts by this author:

Rhodri Morgan did more than steady the Welsh Assembly's early steps, writes Richard Wyn Jones, he led Wales to a point where devolution seems the natural state of affairs.    Back in 2003, a colleague who worked in opinion polling was briefing a team of field researchers in south Wales who were abou... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Richard Wyn Jones on the reasons contributing to a leave vote in a part of the UK that benefits most from EU membership. Turkeys, it seems, do vote for Christmas – at least if they’re Welsh. There can be no doubt that, financially speaking, Wales has been one of the parts of the UK that has benefite... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The UK Government's response to criticism of the draft Wales Bill is more of a staging post than a destination, says Richard Wyn Jones.    When he began the process that would lead to the publication in September 2015 of the Draft Wales Bill, the then Secretary of State, Stephen Crabb, spoke in effu... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Wales has been squeezed harder than Scotland under the Barnett Formula. The challenge now facing First Minister Carwyn Jones is to explain to the Welsh electorate why it is fair that poorer Wales receives less privileged treatment that that given to more prosperous Scotland, writes Richard Wyn Jones... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The implications of the Smith Commission's report for the rest of the UK were highlighted both by the Prime Minister and leaders of English local government within a few hours of its publication. Richard Wyn Jones suggests that Smith may well have serious implications on the other side of the Tweed... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The independence referendum focussed the attention in the UK and beyond on Scotland. However, argues Professor Richard Wyn Jones, the contours of the constitutional debate throughout the UK should not be seen from an entirely Scottish perspective. Let me cut to the chase. Folks, it’s not all about S... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Richard Wyn Jones discusses the ‘Better Together’ campaign, the economic fortunes of Scotland and Wales and the ‘Barnett bonus’. It is rapidly becoming commonplace among political commentators that ‘Better Together’ have run one of the more inept campaigns in British political history. The inquests... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In a piece that examines the implications of Scottish independence for Wales, Richard Wyn Jones makes an impassioned case for a fairer settlement for Wales. Powers for a Purpose, the product of Labour’s Devolution Commission in Scotland,  sets out Labour’s vision for the future of Scotland and the U... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

Latest blogs

  • 20th July 2018

    Richard Parry reviews a fast-evolving situation as the march of time and need to reconcile rhetoric and practicality constrain policy-makers

  • 13th July 2018

    The White Paper published this week talks about the UK Government making ‘sovereign decisions’ to adopt European rules but, as we know from the experience of Norway and Switzerland, this can be an illusory sovereignty when the costs of deviating from the rules is exclusion from the single market or European programmes. CCC Director Professor Michael Keating looks at whether the UK is ready for this kind of deal.

  • 12th July 2018

    Last week the government released its fisheries white paper. While most of the fisheries and Brexit debate centres on quotas and access to waters, there is also an important devolution dimension. Brexit already has profound consequences for the UK’s devolution settlement and fisheries policy is one example of this. So, in addition to communicating its overall vision for post-Brexit fisheries policy, the white paper was also an opportunity for the government to set out how it would see that policy working in the devolved UK.

  • 4th July 2018

    At the same time as Parliament prepares to ‘take back control’ from Brussels, the executive is in fact accruing to itself further control over the legislative process. CCC Fellow Professor Stephen Tierney addresses a number of trends – only some of which are a direct consequence of the unique circumstances of Brexit – which suggest a deeper realignment of institutional power within the constitution and a consequent diminution of Parliament’s legislative power.

  • 27th June 2018

    Faced with a choice between splitting her Cabinet into winners and losers, Theresa May has sought to keep the Brexit crap game going. She does this by avoiding betting on either a hard or soft Brexit. Professor Richard Rose of Strathclyde looks at the high stakes outcomes facing the Prime Minister. .

Read More Posts