Richard Parry

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Richard
Parry
Job Title: 
Honorary Fellow, University of Edinburgh
Organisation: 
University of Edinburgh
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Biography: 

I joined Social Policy in 1983 after working as a civil servant and as a researcher at the University of Strathclyde. I am a political scientist and my work falls in the interconnected areas of public policy, public administration and public sector resource allocation, especially in Scotland and the UK. Earlier research projects included ones on public employment, central-local relations in Scotland, comparative European social policy and privatisation in social policy.

History

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4 years 5 months

Posts by this author:

The UK government’s White Paper of 12 July marked the culmination of the government’s negotiation with itself as it picked cherries even more precisely, like a skilled fruit-picker from the EU on a seasonal contract, on a cloud of rhetoric even more inflated than previously. A special, ambitious, ro... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Richard Parry discusses the interacting policies on devolution and Brexit in the current impasse between UK and devolved governments. As part of their unfolding tactics on Brexit, the Scottish and Welsh Governments have through their legislators taken powers to alter inherited EU-based law in devolv... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Richard Parry discusses the attempts to express political objectives in secure legal wording as Brexit progresses   On 20 December 2017 the  EU Commission set out its draft supplementary negotiating guidelines for the next phase of the Brexit negotiations, during which the arrangements for UK withdr... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The post-Hogmanay atmosphere is always sobering, and never more than this year when the party may be over for some many people in so many ways. During 2017, three great political experiments - Brexit, the Trump Presidency and the Catalonian independence project - failed to progress beyond the damage... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Richard Parry reflects on the first-stage agreement between the UK and EU that defuses political of tension but has little comfort for the proponents of Brexit and leaves all to play for in the territorial politics of Britain and Ireland.    Sometimes even the best-trailed political events happen su... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Richard Parry discusses the impact of three speeches in Florence, Glasgow and Barcelona.    Carles Puigdemont asked his Parliament on 10 October, ‘if that has been possible in one of the oldest, most constituted and exemplary democracies in the world, as in the United Kingdom, why could it not also... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Richard Parry discusses the UK’s return to EU negotiating action.    Despite holiday absences of European leaders, negotiations have been proceeding well in recent weeks and a joint statement has been issued. One side has conceded that any wishful thinking about the UK’s not leaving the EU and its r... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The First Minister's statement to parliament was uncomfortable for her but at least gives her a deadline. In the light of which, suggests Richard Parry, political observers might like to look at a calendar.     Sometimes politics is a matter of managing the calendar and electoral cycle. Nicola Sturg... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Richard Parry assesses the implications of the GE2017 result for Theresa May and Nicola Sturgeon.   Theresa May is in a similar position to Nicola Sturgeon at Holyrood in 2016: she has lost her overall majority but is by a long way the largest party, no winning combination of other parties is credib... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Already late, the launch of the SNP manifesto was held back until yesterday (30 May) by the Manchester bombing. The phrase ‘in Washington, everything is political’ now applies worldwide in the cynical world of professional politics but even the most hard-bitten were sobered by an attack on a demogra... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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Latest blogs

  • 20th July 2018

    Richard Parry reviews a fast-evolving situation as the march of time and need to reconcile rhetoric and practicality constrain policy-makers

  • 13th July 2018

    The White Paper published this week talks about the UK Government making ‘sovereign decisions’ to adopt European rules but, as we know from the experience of Norway and Switzerland, this can be an illusory sovereignty when the costs of deviating from the rules is exclusion from the single market or European programmes. CCC Director Professor Michael Keating looks at whether the UK is ready for this kind of deal.

  • 12th July 2018

    Last week the government released its fisheries white paper. While most of the fisheries and Brexit debate centres on quotas and access to waters, there is also an important devolution dimension. Brexit already has profound consequences for the UK’s devolution settlement and fisheries policy is one example of this. So, in addition to communicating its overall vision for post-Brexit fisheries policy, the white paper was also an opportunity for the government to set out how it would see that policy working in the devolved UK.

  • 4th July 2018

    At the same time as Parliament prepares to ‘take back control’ from Brussels, the executive is in fact accruing to itself further control over the legislative process. CCC Fellow Professor Stephen Tierney addresses a number of trends – only some of which are a direct consequence of the unique circumstances of Brexit – which suggest a deeper realignment of institutional power within the constitution and a consequent diminution of Parliament’s legislative power.

  • 27th June 2018

    Faced with a choice between splitting her Cabinet into winners and losers, Theresa May has sought to keep the Brexit crap game going. She does this by avoiding betting on either a hard or soft Brexit. Professor Richard Rose of Strathclyde looks at the high stakes outcomes facing the Prime Minister. .

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