Peter McGregor

Peter McGregor's picture
Peter
McGregor
Job Title: 
Director of the Strathclyde International Public Policy Institute, Head of Department of Economics
Organisation: 
University of Strathclyde
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Professor Peter McGregor has held visiting academic posts in Sweden and Germany, and has consultancy experience in the Middle and Far East. He has acted as a UNDP-funded consultant to the Economic Planning Unit of the Prime Minister's Department, Malaysia, has been a member of the Bank of England's Panel of Academic Consultants and is currently a Special Researcher to the Development Policy Research Institute, The Hokkaido University, Japan. He has published widely in books and in professional journals, including the European Economic Review, Oxford Economic Papers and the Journal of Regional Science. Current research interests include regional economic modelling and the evaluation of regional economic policies. He was Editor of Regional Studies, the journal of the Regional Studies Association from 1991-1996.

Project Job Role: 
The Economy, Centre on Constitutional Change

History

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5 years 2 months

Posts by this author:

Talk of Scotland adopting a Scandinavian economic model usually comes with no mention of the bill but, suggests recent research, the impact of higher taxes is more complicated than it might at first appear.    The Scottish Government holds up the Scandinavian economic model as one this country might... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The Referendum on Scottish independence held on the 18th September, 2014, resulted in a significant majority vote (55% as against 45%) in favour of “no”. Accordingly, Scotland will remain a member of the U.K. for the foreseeable future. However, further changes in the Scottish fiscal system are i... Read more
Post type: Publication
Much of the debate since the referendum has focussed on which additional powers are likely to be devolved from Westminster to Holyrood. Rather less attention has been paid to the likely impact on the Scottish economy of devolving any of the powers that have been suggested. At the time of writing, th... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Peter McGregor discusses tax powers for Scotland in the event of a no vote. A “no” vote  in the forthcoming referendum on Scottish Independence would immediately lay to rest one of the most controversial issues that has characterised the economic debate so far, namely the currency issue.  Scotland w... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The final report of the Labour Party’s Devolution Commission, published yesterday, contains two main proposals on taxation. Firstly, that the Scottish Parliament’s powers over income taxation should be enhanced with the ability to: vary income tax rates by up to 15p in the pound, compared to the 10p... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
by Patrizio Lecca, Peter McGregor and Kim Swales, Fraser of Allander Institute, Department of Economics and Strathclyde International Public Policy Institute, University of Strathclyde and Centre for Constitutional Change In tone the White Paper appears to mark a move in the direction of the Scandin... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

Latest blogs

  • 19th February 2019

    Over the course of the UK’s preparations for withdrawing from the EU, the issue of the UK’s own internal market has emerged as an issue of concern, and one that has the potentially significant consequences for devolution. Dr Jo Hunt of Cardiff University examines the implications.

  • 12th February 2019

    CCC Fellow Professor Daniel Wincott of Cardiff University examines how Brexit processes have already reshaped territorial politics in the UK and changed its territorial constitution.

  • 7th February 2019

    The future of agriculture policy across the United Kingdom after Brexit is uncertain and risky, according to a new paper by Professor Michael Keating of the Centre on Constitutional Change. Reforms of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy over recent years have shifted the emphasis from farming to the broader concept of rural policy. As member states have gained more discretion in applying policy, the nations of the UK have also diverged, according to local conditions and preferences.

  • 4th February 2019

    In our latest report for the "Repatriation of Competences: Implications for Devolution" project, Professor Nicola McEwen and Dr Alexandra Remond examine how, in the longer term, Brexit poses significant risks for the climate and energy ambitions of the devolved nations. These include the loss of European Structural and Investment Funds targeted at climate and low carbon energy policies, from which the devolved territories have benefited disproportionately. European Investment Bank loan funding, which has financed high risk renewables projects, especially in Scotland, may also no longer be as accessible, while future access to research and innovation funding remains uncertain. The removal of the EU policy framework, which has incentivised the low carbon ambitions of the devolved nations may also result in lost opportunities.

  • 1st February 2019

    The outcome of the various Commons votes this week left certain only that the Government would either secure an amended deal and put it to a meaningful vote on Wednesday 13 February, or in the overwhelmingly likely absence of this make a further statement that day and table another amendable motion for the following day, the Groundhog Day that may lead to a ‘St Valentine’s Day Massacre’ for one side or the other. Richard Parry assesses the further two-week pause in parliamentary action on Brexit

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