Michael Kenny

Michael Kenny's picture
Professor
Michael
Kenny
Job Title: 
Professor of Politics
Organisation: 
Queen Mary University of London
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Professor Michael Kenny is Director of the Mile End Institute. 

Prior to moving to Queen Mary, he held posts at Queen’s University, Belfast, the College of William and Mary in the US, and Sheffield University (where he was appointed Head of Department). He has been awarded Visiting Fellowships at: Wolfson College, Oxford; the Centre for Research into the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities at Cambridge; and, most recently, the Centre for Science and Policy at Cambridge. From September 2012 to August 2014 he held a Leverhulme Trust Major Research Fellowship.  

He was a founding editorial board member of the journal New Political Economy, serves on the boards of Political Quarterly, Juncture, Contemporary Political Theory, Global Politics and Open Political Science, and was one of the co-editors of the Oxford Handbook of British Politics. He is a former member of the Virtual College of the Economic and Social Research Council and currently sits on the Leverhulme Trust’s Advisory Committee.

Michael’s media work involves writing for a wide range of newspapers and magazines, and appearing as a commentator on a variety of radio and television programmes.

Twitter - @michaelkenny_

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View Michael's experts on camera video.

View Michael's seminar on 'Understanding the Re-emergence of the English Question' given at UCL's Constitution Unit on the 8th December 2014

 

Project Job Role: 
Governance, Centre on Constitutional Change

History

Blog
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Member for
3 years 6 months

Posts by this author:

"Will the Prime Minister provide a commitment today that no part of the great repeal bill will be subject to English votes for English laws?” This seemingly technical query – posed by the SNP’s Kirsty Blackman at PMQs the day after the Prime Minister had outlined the government’s plans for Brexit –... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In the aftermath of Brexit, there has been an upsurge of interest in English nationalism. But what exactly is English nationalism, where does it come from, and what role, if any, did it play in the referendum outcome? In this extended article, Michael Kenny investigates. This article appeared origin... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The notion that English nationalism has played a causal role in the EU referendum debate has widely been both accepted and promoted. Alongside this is a portrait of two Englands; one progressive and cosmopolitan, the other populist and nationalist. Mike Kenny argues that this Manichean dichotomy is... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The UK government's recent defeat on its proposals to relax Sunday trading rules saw the votes of Scottish MPs prove decisive, although the policy would have applied only in England and Wales. Daniel Gover and Michael Kenny discuss why the English Votes for English Laws rules could not help the gove... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
As the European referendum comes to loom ever larger in British politics, it is apparent that a number of distinct, pulsating national questions will do much to affect its outcome. For a start, divergent views on this issue may well lead to the exacerbation of territorial tensions across the UK, sho... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
This current reform is also likely to have wider constitutional implications. It is possible that it will in time lead to pressure for a more substantive form of EVEL, particularly if further powers are devolved to other parts of the UK. 
Post type: Publication
The government’s proposals for introducing EVEL are, on one level, an internal matter for the House of Commons. Yet they also raise substantial constitutional questions that extend far beyond the lower chamber, including whether it is appropriate for England to now be treated as a distinctive politi... Read more
Post type: Publication
Michael Kenny and Daniel Gover consider the constitutional implications of parliament's approval of English Votes for English Laws. This article was first published on the Constitution Unit blog. The decision by MPs to approve changes to the House of Commons Standing Orders that implement the princi... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
A year has passed since the historic referendum on Scotland’s future but its imprint upon politics and politicians across the UK remains indelible.   One of the overlooked effects of the referendum has been its impact upon English sensibilities.   There is some evidence to suggest that many who live... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The growing debate over English Votes for English Laws (EVEL) has so far focused on the difficulties facing the government as it seeks to design and implement a complicated, and potentially incendiary, set of changes to the procedures of the Commons. Faced by a united front from the opposition parti... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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