Michael Kenny

Michael Kenny's picture
Professor
Michael
Kenny
Job Title: 
Professor of Public Policy
Organisation: 
University of Cambridge
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Professor Michael Kenny is Director of the Cambridge Institute for Public Policy. Prior to moving to Cambridge, he held posts at Queen Mary Univresity London, Queen’s University, Belfast, the College of William and Mary in the US, and Sheffield University. He has been awarded Visiting Fellowships at: Wolfson College, Oxford; the Centre for Research into the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities at Cambridge; and, most recently, the Centre for Science and Policy at Cambridge. From September 2012 to August 2014 he held a Leverhulme Trust Major Research Fellowship.  In addition to being a fellow of the Centre on Constitutional Change, he is currently a Visiting Fellow at the UCL’s Constitution Unit, sits on the Leverhulme Trust’s Advisory Committee, is co-director of the British Academy’s “Governing England” programme, and is a member of an external experts panel convened by the Scottish Parliament to advise on the constitutional implications of Brexit.

Twitter - @michaelkenny_

 

Project Job Role: 
Governance, Centre on Constitutional Change

History

Blog
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Member for
4 years 10 months

Posts by this author:

With little enough fanfare, Cabinet Office Minister David Liddington MP set out how Britain will operate post-Brexit. Prof Michael Kenny and Jack Sheldon consider what he had to say.   Last Monday Cabinet Office minister David Lidington delivered to little fanfare one of the most significant speeche... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Labour’s Unavoidable English Question   In 2015, the Conservative government implemented ‘English Votes for English Laws’ (or EVEL) in the House of Commons as a way of responding to the ‘English Question’. Labour, by contrast, has had relatively little to say in this area – but were the party to for... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
"Will the Prime Minister provide a commitment today that no part of the great repeal bill will be subject to English votes for English laws?” This seemingly technical query – posed by the SNP’s Kirsty Blackman at PMQs the day after the Prime Minister had outlined the government’s plans for Brexit –... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In the aftermath of Brexit, there has been an upsurge of interest in English nationalism. But what exactly is English nationalism, where does it come from, and what role, if any, did it play in the referendum outcome? In this extended article, Michael Kenny investigates. This article appeared origin... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The notion that English nationalism has played a causal role in the EU referendum debate has widely been both accepted and promoted. Alongside this is a portrait of two Englands; one progressive and cosmopolitan, the other populist and nationalist. Mike Kenny argues that this Manichean dichotomy is... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The UK government's recent defeat on its proposals to relax Sunday trading rules saw the votes of Scottish MPs prove decisive, although the policy would have applied only in England and Wales. Daniel Gover and Michael Kenny discuss why the English Votes for English Laws rules could not help the gove... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
As the European referendum comes to loom ever larger in British politics, it is apparent that a number of distinct, pulsating national questions will do much to affect its outcome. For a start, divergent views on this issue may well lead to the exacerbation of territorial tensions across the UK, sho... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
This current reform is also likely to have wider constitutional implications. It is possible that it will in time lead to pressure for a more substantive form of EVEL, particularly if further powers are devolved to other parts of the UK. 
Post type: Publication
The government’s proposals for introducing EVEL are, on one level, an internal matter for the House of Commons. Yet they also raise substantial constitutional questions that extend far beyond the lower chamber, including whether it is appropriate for England to now be treated as a distinctive politi... Read more
Post type: Publication
Michael Kenny and Daniel Gover consider the constitutional implications of parliament's approval of English Votes for English Laws. This article was first published on the Constitution Unit blog. The decision by MPs to approve changes to the House of Commons Standing Orders that implement the princi... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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Latest blogs

  • 10th August 2018

    Brexit is re-making the UK’s constitution under our noses. The territorial constitution is particularly fragile. Pursuing Brexit, Theresa May’s government has stumbled into deep questions about devolution.

  • 8th August 2018

    The UK in a Changing Europe has formed a new Brexit Policy Panel (BPP). The BPP is a cross-disciplinary group of over 100 leading social scientists created to provide ongoing analysis of where we have got to in the Brexit process, and to forecast where we are headed. Members of the UK in a Changing Europe Brexit Policy Panel complete a monthly survey addressing three key areas of uncertainty around Brexit: if —and when—the UK will leave the EU; how Brexit will affect British politics; and what our relationship with the EU is likely to look like in the future. The CCC participates on the Panel.

  • 2nd August 2018

    The House of Commons Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee issued its report ‘Devolution and Exiting the EU: reconciling differences and building strong relationships’. Discussing its contents, Professor Nicola McEwen suggests that the report includes some practical recommendations, some of which were informed by CCC research. It also shines a light on some of the more difficult challenges ahead.

  • 31st July 2018

    The politicisation of Brexit, combined with deteriorating relations between London and Dublin, has created a toxic atmosphere in Northern Ireland, says Mary Murphy, which will require imagination and possibly new institutions to resolve.

  • 25th July 2018

    Given that there are many policy differences between Northern Ireland and other parts of the UK, asks Jonathan Evershed, why has customs policy been singled out as a red line by Unionists?

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