Michael Keating

Michael Keating's picture
Professor
Michael
Keating
Job Title: 
Professor of Politics, University of Aberdeen and Director of ESRC Centre on Constitutional Change
Organisation: 
University of Aberdeen
Phone Number: 
+44 (0) 7758 329 876
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Michael Keating is Professor of Politics at the University of Aberdeen, part-time Professor at the University of Edinburgh and Director of the ESRC Centre on Constitutional Change. He has a BA from the University of Oxford and in 1975 was the first PhD graduate from what is now Glasgow Caledonian University. He has taught in several universities including Strathclyde, Western Ontario and the European University Institute, as well as universities in Spain and France.  He is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the Academy of Social Sciences. Michael Keating is the author or editor of over thirty books on Scottish politics, European politics, nationalism and regionalism. Among his recent books are The Independence of Scotland (Oxford University Press, 2009) and Rescaling the European State (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Project Job Role: 
Director, Centre on Constitutional Change

History

Blog
View recent blog entries
Member for
4 years 10 months

Posts by this author:

The Sewel Convention has historically worked well, says Michael Keating, but Brexit will put it to the test. A fraught point in the handling of the EU Withdrawal Bill has been the way in which it deals with those competences that are currently both devolved and Europeanized. The UK and devolved gove... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The Irish border has proved to be one of the most intractable aspects of Brexit, says Michael Keating, and the proposals put forward by the UK Government show little signs of being endorsed by Dublin or, as a result, Brussels.    One of the most intractable issues remaining in the Brexit negotiation... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Study: Uncertain Post-Brexit Future for Farmers in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland    Agriculture in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland faces an uncertain future after Brexit according to a new study from the Centre on Constitutional Change, The Repatriation of Competences in Agriculture afte... Read more
Post type: Publication
The current compromise on the border issue between Northern Ireland and the Republic relies on a subsequent technocratic fix, which, says Michael Keating,  provides ample material for arguments in the course of the next round of negotiations.    Agreement has now been reached on moving on to the sec... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The interplay between Brexit and devolution is a complex one and, as yet, says Michael Keating, there is little to suggest that the questions it raises have been answered.    One of the key issues in Brexit concerns the fate of those competences that are currently shared between the EU and the devol... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Much of the Brexit-related talk has focused on the size of the money pie but, says Michael Keating, determining how it will be cut is just as important.  After Brexit, money currently spent on EU agriculture and structural funds will revert to the UK. These are the largest items in the EU budget so... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Philosophers have long argued over who has the right to self-determination and by what means. For nationalists, the answer might be obvious – it is the nation. Yet we know that nations are created, reshaped and contested over time. Primordial constructions of the nation, based on blood and descent,... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Neither the Spanish nor Catalan government's have the mandate or the room for manoeuvre that would allow them to break the current impasse, says Michael Keating.    Catalans’ views on the proposed independence referendum differ. Some are completely in favour and will vote Yes. Others believe that Ca... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Decisions over the repatriation of powers and the role of a 'UK single Market' will have significant implications for the future of devolution and the nature of the UK as a state, says Michael Keating.  The devolution statutes for Scotland and Wales of the late 1990s were more permissive than those... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
M. Keating, G. Laforest (Eds.) - Constitutional Politics and the Territorial Question in Canada and the United Kingdom Federalism and Devolution Compared Series: Comparative Territorial Politics Contributes to our understanding of constitutional and political developments taking place in Canada and... Read more
Post type: Publication

Pages

Latest blogs

  • 18th May 2018

    Different political actors have responded to the decision by the Scottish Parliament to withhold its consent for the UK Government’s showpiece EU (Withdrawal) Bill in very different ways. Prof Nicola McEwen sifts the facts from the hyperbole and explains where we are and where we go from here.

  • 15th May 2018

    On 8 May the UK’s House of Lords passed an amendment to require the House of Commons to vote on remaining in the European Economic Area (EEA), the possibility of Britain adopting the so-called ‘Norway model’ is back on the agenda of British politics. Here the authors of Squaring the Circle on Brexit: Could the Norway Model Work?, John Erik Fossum and Hans Petter Graver, give some background to Norway’s relationship with the European Union and reveal the truth behind some common myths about the Norway model.

  • 4th May 2018

    The Sewel Convention has historically worked well, says Michael Keating, but Brexit will put it to the test.

  • 3rd May 2018

    Amendments to controversial Clause 11 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill were agreed in the House of Lords yesterday evening, following a deal between the UK and Welsh governments last week. Jack Sheldon and Mike Kenny explain the significance of this agreement for the UK as a whole and outline a number of unresolved issues it raises.

  • 2nd May 2018

    The hesitant progress of Brexit legislation through Westminster has provided parliament with an opportunity to show its teeth and, says Tobias Lock, it demonstrates that the legislature has bite as well as bark.

Read More Posts