Michael Keating

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Professor
Michael
Keating
Job Title: 
Professor of Politics, University of Aberdeen and Director of ESRC Centre on Constitutional Change
Organisation: 
University of Aberdeen
Phone Number: 
+44 (0) 7758 329 876
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Michael Keating is Professor of Politics at the University of Aberdeen, part-time Professor at the University of Edinburgh and Director of the ESRC Centre on Constitutional Change. He has a BA from the University of Oxford and in 1975 was the first PhD graduate from what is now Glasgow Caledonian University. He has taught in several universities including Strathclyde, Western Ontario and the European University Institute, as well as universities in Spain and France.  He is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the Academy of Social Sciences. Michael Keating is the author or editor of over thirty books on Scottish politics, European politics, nationalism and regionalism. Among his recent books are The Independence of Scotland (Oxford University Press, 2009) and Rescaling the European State (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Project Job Role: 
Director, Centre on Constitutional Change

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3 years 8 months

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How can Scotland become a wealthier and fairer (and also healthier, safer, stronger, smarter and greener) country using the powers now devolved to the Scottish Parliament. Michael Keating outlines his most recent book, a collection of essays by CCC fellows on the political economy of constitutional... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
With Nicola Sturgeon and Theresa May taking apparently incompatible positions over a second independence referendum, Michael Keating considers whether the constitution is now at breaking point.  The UK Government’s decision appears to be final. A Scottish independence referendum is not ruled out in... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Brexit poses a considerable challenge to both sides in the Scottish indeopendence debate, says Michael Keating, as the demand to take back sovereignty requires us to say where it comes back to; London or Edinburgh.   The independence referendum of 2014 divided Scotland into two camps, a division tha... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Michaell Keating discusses how we are still a long way from federalism but closer to a constitutional clash as further Brexit legislation looms. This article appeard in The Herald. The devolution settlements of 1999 were a way of squaring a circle. On the one hand, they gave the non-English parts of... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In 2014 Scots voted to remain in the United Kingdom by 55 per cent. This year they voted 62 per cent to remain in the European Union. With the UK now heading for Brexit, they cannot have both. Michael Keating discusses what happens next. This article originally appeared in The Herald. IN 2014 Scots... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The UK Government may well have overplayed its hand in the case recently heard by the Supreme Court, explains Michael Keating.   It is well known that the United Kingdom does not have a codified, written constitution, to which reference can be made when matters of constitutional law are in question.... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
On 24 October the plenary Joint Ministerial Committee [JMC (P)] of UK, Scottish, Welsh and Northern Ireland leaders met for the first time in two years. The occasion for resurrecting what had become an almost moribund body was to discuss the ‘UK approach’ to Brexit promised by the Prime Minister. Th... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The simple answer is 'No' - if Scotland and Northern Ireland were to remain within the single market and customs union, they could not simultaneously be within the UK economic union.    In the aftermath of the referendum vote, there was much support in Scotland and Northern Ireland for a ‘soft Brexi... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
If Westminster were to assert the view that Brexit falls under foreign affairs and is therefore a reserved matter, the devolved territories would have little legal recourse but, says Michael Keating, doing would re-open the whole question of the nature of the union.  The UK Government has promised a... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In this extended blog, Prof Michael Keating considers Scotland's options for remaining in the EU - economically, politically or both.    In 2014 Scotland voted by 55 per cent to stay in the United Kingdom. Now it has voted by a larger margin (62 per cent) to stay in the European Union. It cannot, it... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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