Meryl Kenny

Meryl Kenny's picture
Dr
Meryl
Kenny
Job Title: 
Lecturer in Gender and Politics
Organisation: 
University of Edinburgh
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Meryl Kenny is Lecturer in Gender and Politics at the University of Edinburgh. She joined the subject area of Politics and International Relations in August 2015, having held previous positions at the University of Leicester, the University of New South Wales and the University of Edinburgh. 

Meryl is an elected Trustee of the Political Studies Association (2015-18) and currently co-convenes the PSA Women and Politics Specialist Group (@PSAWomenPol on Twitter), which was awarded the inaugural PSA Specialist Group of the Year Prize in 2014.

She is also Co-Director of the Feminism and Institutionalism International Network (FIIN), based at Edinburgh, and an Associate Editor of Scottish Affairs. Additionally, Meryl co-convenes the Gender Politics Research Group, which hosts the genderpol blog  (@genderpol on Twitter).

History

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Posts by this author:

In the upcoming but overlooked local elections the issue of women's representation has once again been sidelined. Dr Meryl Kenny and Prof Fiona Mackay argue that this matter is too important to be left to parties and that it is time for legislation.    Since the announcement of an early general elec... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Meryl Kenny suggests that women in the top jobs would send a powerful message about who is fit to lead—and not just in times of crisis. A week is a long time in politics. Britain’s vote to leave the European Union (EU) has been, above all, a failure of political leadership—one that has left the coun... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Constitutional or legislative quotas are becoming an increasingly popular means of addressing the under-representation of women in elected assemblies but, says Meryl Kenny, they can be effective, so long as they have teeth.    Constitutions capture aspirations for the future, setting out broader pri... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The 2015 General Election is one of the most unpredictable electoral contests in British political history. Amidst all the post-election scenario discussions, though, lies one political certainty – the overwhelming majority of the MPs elected to the House of Commons on 7 May will be men. Five years... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

Latest blogs

  • 19th February 2019

    Over the course of the UK’s preparations for withdrawing from the EU, the issue of the UK’s own internal market has emerged as an issue of concern, and one that has the potentially significant consequences for devolution. Dr Jo Hunt of Cardiff University examines the implications.

  • 12th February 2019

    CCC Fellow Professor Daniel Wincott of Cardiff University examines how Brexit processes have already reshaped territorial politics in the UK and changed its territorial constitution.

  • 7th February 2019

    The future of agriculture policy across the United Kingdom after Brexit is uncertain and risky, according to a new paper by Professor Michael Keating of the Centre on Constitutional Change. Reforms of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy over recent years have shifted the emphasis from farming to the broader concept of rural policy. As member states have gained more discretion in applying policy, the nations of the UK have also diverged, according to local conditions and preferences.

  • 4th February 2019

    In our latest report for the "Repatriation of Competences: Implications for Devolution" project, Professor Nicola McEwen and Dr Alexandra Remond examine how, in the longer term, Brexit poses significant risks for the climate and energy ambitions of the devolved nations. These include the loss of European Structural and Investment Funds targeted at climate and low carbon energy policies, from which the devolved territories have benefited disproportionately. European Investment Bank loan funding, which has financed high risk renewables projects, especially in Scotland, may also no longer be as accessible, while future access to research and innovation funding remains uncertain. The removal of the EU policy framework, which has incentivised the low carbon ambitions of the devolved nations may also result in lost opportunities.

  • 1st February 2019

    The outcome of the various Commons votes this week left certain only that the Government would either secure an amended deal and put it to a meaningful vote on Wednesday 13 February, or in the overwhelmingly likely absence of this make a further statement that day and table another amendable motion for the following day, the Groundhog Day that may lead to a ‘St Valentine’s Day Massacre’ for one side or the other. Richard Parry assesses the further two-week pause in parliamentary action on Brexit

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