Luis Moreno

Luis Moreno's picture
Luis
Moreno
Job Title: 
Research Professor
Organisation: 
Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Founding Manager of the Institute for Advanced Social Studies (Instituto de Estudios Sociales Avanzados), institutional precursor of the Institute of Public Goods and Policies (Instituto de Políticas y Bienes Públicos, CSIC).
Graduate of the Universidad Complutense (Madrid), he was awarded his Ph.D. in Social Sciences at the University of Edinburgh, where he is Honorary Fellow at the School of Social and Political Science.
Access to his publications at: http://csic.academia.edu/LuisMoreno

History

Blog
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Member for
5 years 4 months

Posts by this author:

The key to understanding the 2017 Catalan election is to be found in another vote that took place two years earlier and, says Luis Moreno, a realization that Catalan politics is polarized.    To gain perspective on the outcome of Catalonia’s election of December 21 2017, it is useful to look in retr... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Where now for the Catalan independence movement? Prof Luis Moreno considers whether recent events mark the end of the road or the start of a new phase of the journey.    With the constitutional sanctioning of the Upper House, the Spanish central government has implemented measures to take control of... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
It is time to listen to those proposals for a path forward that lie between independence and the status quo, says Professor Luis Moreno.    The failure of Catalan secessionists to proclaim a declaration of unilateral independence in the Catalan Parliament on October 11 has several readings. It has b... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Guest blog by Luis Moreno, Research Professor (Spanish National Research Council, CSIC) and Honorary Fellow (University of Edinburgh) Following the anti-climax of the 1979 Referendum results, the nationalist camp viewed Scotland’s political future inexorably linked to the formation of a fully-fledge... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Guest blog by Luis Moreno - Research Professor at the Institute of Public Goods and Policies (IPP) within the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) This blog originally appeared on LSE EUROPP – European Politics and Policy blog and Agenda Pública Scotland is due to hold an independence referendum... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

Latest blogs

  • 19th February 2019

    Over the course of the UK’s preparations for withdrawing from the EU, the issue of the UK’s own internal market has emerged as an issue of concern, and one that has the potentially significant consequences for devolution. Dr Jo Hunt of Cardiff University examines the implications.

  • 12th February 2019

    CCC Fellow Professor Daniel Wincott of Cardiff University examines how Brexit processes have already reshaped territorial politics in the UK and changed its territorial constitution.

  • 7th February 2019

    The future of agriculture policy across the United Kingdom after Brexit is uncertain and risky, according to a new paper by Professor Michael Keating of the Centre on Constitutional Change. Reforms of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy over recent years have shifted the emphasis from farming to the broader concept of rural policy. As member states have gained more discretion in applying policy, the nations of the UK have also diverged, according to local conditions and preferences.

  • 4th February 2019

    In our latest report for the "Repatriation of Competences: Implications for Devolution" project, Professor Nicola McEwen and Dr Alexandra Remond examine how, in the longer term, Brexit poses significant risks for the climate and energy ambitions of the devolved nations. These include the loss of European Structural and Investment Funds targeted at climate and low carbon energy policies, from which the devolved territories have benefited disproportionately. European Investment Bank loan funding, which has financed high risk renewables projects, especially in Scotland, may also no longer be as accessible, while future access to research and innovation funding remains uncertain. The removal of the EU policy framework, which has incentivised the low carbon ambitions of the devolved nations may also result in lost opportunities.

  • 1st February 2019

    The outcome of the various Commons votes this week left certain only that the Government would either secure an amended deal and put it to a meaningful vote on Wednesday 13 February, or in the overwhelmingly likely absence of this make a further statement that day and table another amendable motion for the following day, the Groundhog Day that may lead to a ‘St Valentine’s Day Massacre’ for one side or the other. Richard Parry assesses the further two-week pause in parliamentary action on Brexit

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