Kristen Hopewell

Kristen Hopewell's picture
Kristen
Hopewell
Job Title: 
Senior Lecturer in International Political Economy
Organisation: 
University of Edinburgh
Biography: 

Kristen Hopewell is a Senior Lecturer in International Political Economy at the University of Edinburgh. Her research and teaching interests are in international trade, global governance, industrial policy and development, with a focus on emerging powers.

Her award-winning book, ​Breaking the WTO: How Emerging Powers Disrupted the Neoliberal Project (Stanford University Press, 2016), analyzes the rising power of Brazil, India and China at the World Trade Organization and their impact on the trading system. She currently holds an ESRC Future Research Leaders grant to investigate the changing global dynamics of export credit amid contemporary power shifts. Her research has been supported by a Fulbright Fellowship, the UK Global Research Challenges Fund, the US National Science Foundation (NSF), the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), and the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). 

Dr. Hopewell’s policy writings have appeared in Foreign Affairs, The Washington Post, Current History and Global Policy, and her analysis has featured in Foreign Policy, The Chicago Tribune, China Daily, The Indian Express and on the BBC.

Prior to entering academia, she worked as a trade official for the Canadian government and as an investment banker for Morgan Stanley.

 

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Posts by this author:

In May 2018, the Leave Means Leave organisation issued a report called ‘Max Fac works: The Technological Solution to the Irish Border Customs Issue’.  The report says that existing technology and best practice is “more than capable of permitting a friction-free border”.   The report was welcomed by... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The issue with trade negotiations is that they are reciprocal negotiations. In order to gain something in a negotiation your country has to be willing to make a concession to the other country. To gain something you have to be willing to give something. On tariffs you have to agree to lower your tar... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Canada is a federal state with a division of power between the federal Government and the provinces, with some matters of jurisdiction at the authority of the federal Government, some at the provinces and some split between the two. The federal Government has authority for negotiating and signing tr... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Kristen Hopewell and Matias E. Margulis discuss how post Brexit vote the UK will negotiate terms of trading with the rest of the world. While most discussion since the Brexit vote has focused on how the UK will negotiate the terms of its new trading relationship with the EU, much less has been said... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

Latest blogs

  • 22nd January 2019

    The UK is increasingly polarised by Brexit identities and they seem to have become stronger than party identities, a new academic report finds. Only one in 16 people did not have a Brexit identity, while more than one in five said they had no party identity. Sir John Curtice’s latest analysis of public opinion on a further referendum finds there has been no decisive shift in favour of another referendum. The report, Brexit and public opinion 2019, by The UK in a Changing Europe, provides an authoritative, comprehensive and up-to-date guide to public opinion on each of the key issues around Brexit. CCC Fellow, Dr Coree Brown Swan contributed a chapter on "the SNP, Brexit and the politics of independence"

  • 22nd January 2019

    In the papers accompanying the draft Environment (Principles and Governance) Bill published at the end of 2018, the UK Government says that it is “exploring opportunities to co-design the final proposals with the devolved administrations.” There are clear benefits in having strong co-operation and collaboration across the UK in the oversight of our environmental law and performance. Yet the challenge of finding a way forward in terms of working together is substantial since each part of the UK is in a different position at present. Given where things stand today, it may be better to accept that a good resolution is not possible immediately and to revisit the issue at a later stage - so long as there is a strong commitment to return and not allow interim arrangements to become fixed. Colin Reid, Professor of Environmental Law at the University of Dundee examines the issues.

  • 17th January 2019

    Richard Parry assesses a memorable day in UK parliamentary history as the Commons splits 432-202 on 15 January 2019 against the Government's recommended Brexit route. It was the most dramatic night at Westminster since the Labour government’s defeat on a confidence motion in 1979.

  • 17th January 2019

    What is the Irish government’s Brexit wish-list? The suggestion that Irish unity, as opposed to safeguarding political and economic stability, is the foremost concern of the Irish government is to misunderstand and misrepresent the motivations of this key Brexit stakeholder, writes Mary C. Murphy (University College Cork).

  • 17th January 2019

    Brexit is in trouble but not because of the Irish backstop, argues the CCC's Michael Keating.

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