Jo Hunt

Jo Hunt's picture
Dr
Jo
Hunt
Job Title: 
Reader in Law
Organisation: 
Cardiff University
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Dr Jo Hunt has a background in interdisciplinary (law and political science) work on the EU. She graduated with an LL.B with European Legal Studies from the University of Southampton in 1994. This was followed by an LL.M in International, European and Comparative Law at Keele University, and then a PhD from the University of Leeds on policy evolution in EU employment policy.

Before arriving in Cardiff in 2001, Jo was a lecturer at Leeds University. She teaches EU modules across undergraduate and postgraduate programmes, has a Postgraduate Certificate in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (Leeds, 2005), and is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Her current research interests focus on aspects of regionalism and devolution in the context of the European Union. In 2015 she was appointed as a Senior Fellow under the ESRC's UK in a Changing Europe initiative, with a project looking at the UK Devolution and the EU referendum (see http://www.ukandeu.ac.uk). She is working with colleagues in the Wales Governance Centre on Wales and Brexit issues, see the Wales and EU Hub http://sites.cardiff.ac.uk/wgc/eu/

Jo Hunt is the former current Legal Developments contributor to the Journal of Common Market Studies Annual Review, and has also been (with Dr. Chloe Wallace, Leeds University) European Developments section editor of the Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law.

Since 2003 she hs been on the editorial board of the Journal of Law and Society. She is a past member of the executive of the Socio-Legal Studies Association, and  a current member of the ESRC Peer Review College.

 

History

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Latest blogs

  • 22nd January 2019

    The UK is increasingly polarised by Brexit identities and they seem to have become stronger than party identities, a new academic report finds. Only one in 16 people did not have a Brexit identity, while more than one in five said they had no party identity. Sir John Curtice’s latest analysis of public opinion on a further referendum finds there has been no decisive shift in favour of another referendum. The report, Brexit and public opinion 2019, by The UK in a Changing Europe, provides an authoritative, comprehensive and up-to-date guide to public opinion on each of the key issues around Brexit. CCC Fellow, Dr Coree Brown Swan contributed a chapter on "the SNP, Brexit and the politics of independence"

  • 22nd January 2019

    In the papers accompanying the draft Environment (Principles and Governance) Bill published at the end of 2018, the UK Government says that it is “exploring opportunities to co-design the final proposals with the devolved administrations.” There are clear benefits in having strong co-operation and collaboration across the UK in the oversight of our environmental law and performance. Yet the challenge of finding a way forward in terms of working together is substantial since each part of the UK is in a different position at present. Given where things stand today, it may be better to accept that a good resolution is not possible immediately and to revisit the issue at a later stage - so long as there is a strong commitment to return and not allow interim arrangements to become fixed. Colin Reid, Professor of Environmental Law at the University of Dundee examines the issues.

  • 17th January 2019

    Richard Parry assesses a memorable day in UK parliamentary history as the Commons splits 432-202 on 15 January 2019 against the Government's recommended Brexit route. It was the most dramatic night at Westminster since the Labour government’s defeat on a confidence motion in 1979.

  • 17th January 2019

    What is the Irish government’s Brexit wish-list? The suggestion that Irish unity, as opposed to safeguarding political and economic stability, is the foremost concern of the Irish government is to misunderstand and misrepresent the motivations of this key Brexit stakeholder, writes Mary C. Murphy (University College Cork).

  • 17th January 2019

    Brexit is in trouble but not because of the Irish backstop, argues the CCC's Michael Keating.

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