Eve Hepburn

Eve Hepburn's picture
Dr
Eve
Hepburn
Job Title: 
Founding CEO & Editor-in-Chief
Organisation: 
Fearless Femme
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Eve Hepburn is an Executive Director of Fearless Femme CIC, as well as being the founder, CEO and Editor-in-Chief. She is also the Managing Director of PolicyScribe, a policy research consultancy.

Eve has held academic positions at leading universities throughout Europe and North America, and was most recently Senior Lecturer in Politics at the University of Edinburgh. She has authored eight books and over 40 refereed journal articles on various social science topics, and she is keenly interested in mental health, public policy, immigration and European integration.

She has also provided policy advice to a range of organisations including the Scottish Parliament, UK Parliament, Canadian Government, Sardinian Government, Aland Parliament, Scottish Funding Council, the BBC and Glasgow City Council. Eve is Non-Executive Director of WomenBeing, Trustee of the Articulate Cultural Trust, and Associate Editor of Scottish Affairs.

 

Project Job Role: 
Politics and International Relations

History

Blog
View recent blog entries
Member for
4 years 5 months

Posts by this author:

Eve Hepburn explores the SNP government's approach to EU nationals in the aftermath of the vote for Brexit.  One of the issues that appears to have infuriated First Minister Nicola Sturgeon the most in the post-EU referendum political turmoil is the insecurity it has created for EU nationals living... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Nicola Sturgeon vowed to explore all options to keep Scotland in the EU. Eve Hepburn asks, what might these options be and how likely are they to be successful? IN the aftermath of the Brexit vote, Nicola Sturgeon has stated that the prospect of taking Scotland out of the EU against its will is “dem... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Eve Hepburn explores the possibility of a federacy model for Scotland. This post was originally published at E-IR. A great deal of analysis has gone into why Scotland voted ‘no’ to separating from the UK, in a referendum on independence held on 18 September 2014, by 55% to 45%. In a series of sophis... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
One can imagine that the European Commission breathed a collective sigh of relief when the results of the Scottish independence referendum were announced on 19 September 2014. The independence referendum had created a headache - if not a chronic migraine - for officials in Brussels, in trying to fig... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In a blog originally published on the PSA blog, Eve Hepburn discusses the days after the referendum. In Scotland the traditional cure for a hangover is a can of Irn-Bru – the nation’s favourite bubble-gum flavoured soft-drink. And it is very likely that today, Irn-Bru owners AG Barr will be doing a... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In a blog originally published at LSE Politics and Policy, Eve Hepburn discusses the need for change whatever the referendum outcome. With a day to go, the result of the independence referendum in Scotland balances on a knife-edge. The latest ‘poll of polls’ has put the ‘Yes’ and ‘No’ camps on a vir... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In a blog originally published by the LSE European Politics and Policy blog, Eve Hepburn looks at the impact the Scottish vote might have on the Italian regions. Something peculiar is happening in Italy. A country that was reluctantly soldered together by the efforts of Mazzini, Cavour and Garibaldi... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

Latest blogs

  • 19th February 2019

    Over the course of the UK’s preparations for withdrawing from the EU, the issue of the UK’s own internal market has emerged as an issue of concern, and one that has the potentially significant consequences for devolution. Dr Jo Hunt of Cardiff University examines the implications.

  • 12th February 2019

    CCC Fellow Professor Daniel Wincott of Cardiff University examines how Brexit processes have already reshaped territorial politics in the UK and changed its territorial constitution.

  • 7th February 2019

    The future of agriculture policy across the United Kingdom after Brexit is uncertain and risky, according to a new paper by Professor Michael Keating of the Centre on Constitutional Change. Reforms of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy over recent years have shifted the emphasis from farming to the broader concept of rural policy. As member states have gained more discretion in applying policy, the nations of the UK have also diverged, according to local conditions and preferences.

  • 4th February 2019

    In our latest report for the "Repatriation of Competences: Implications for Devolution" project, Professor Nicola McEwen and Dr Alexandra Remond examine how, in the longer term, Brexit poses significant risks for the climate and energy ambitions of the devolved nations. These include the loss of European Structural and Investment Funds targeted at climate and low carbon energy policies, from which the devolved territories have benefited disproportionately. European Investment Bank loan funding, which has financed high risk renewables projects, especially in Scotland, may also no longer be as accessible, while future access to research and innovation funding remains uncertain. The removal of the EU policy framework, which has incentivised the low carbon ambitions of the devolved nations may also result in lost opportunities.

  • 1st February 2019

    The outcome of the various Commons votes this week left certain only that the Government would either secure an amended deal and put it to a meaningful vote on Wednesday 13 February, or in the overwhelmingly likely absence of this make a further statement that day and table another amendable motion for the following day, the Groundhog Day that may lead to a ‘St Valentine’s Day Massacre’ for one side or the other. Richard Parry assesses the further two-week pause in parliamentary action on Brexit

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