Craig McAngus

Craig McAngus's picture
Dr
Craig
McAngus
Job Title: 
Lecturer
Organisation: 
University of Aberdeen
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Craig was part of a project looking at how Scotland could become more gender equal, focussing specifically on care policy.  His other research interests include political parties, elections, electoral behaviour and territorial politics.

Project Job Role: 
Policy Challenges and the Future of Scotland, Centre on Constitutional Change

History

Blog
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Member for
4 years 4 months

Posts by this author:

The question of Scottish independence has taken centre stage in the public debate since the Brexit vote. England and Wales have voted to leave the EU, but Scotland and Northern Ireland have voted to remain. Together with this differing outcome, the absence of a post-referendum plan – and of any sign... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The clear difference between Scotland's Remain vote and the preference south of the border has rekindled the independence debate but, says Craig McAngus, all is not entirely straightforward for the SNP.   One question that was omnipresent in the EU referendum debate referred to Scotland: what would... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The assumption that Scotland is a left-wing country and, perhaps more importantly, more left-wing than England is one that pervades discussion of Scottish politics. Of course, Scottish politics has been dominated by parties on the left since the 1980s, and elite political discourse in Scotland is a... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Could a Corbyn victory win former Scottish Labour voters back from the SNP? Craig McAngus suggests that they may agree with him on many issues but the constitution would remain a sticking point.  Suggestions that Jeremy Corbyn is ahead in the race for UK Labour’s leadership raise some interesting qu... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The Conservatives rejection of devolved top ups for welfare payments isn't a breach of the Smith Agreement, says Craig McAngus, but it certainly seems to throw away the party's own Strathclyde Commission report.    Scottish National Party MPs tabled a number of amendments to the Scotland Bill curren... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Craig McAngus looks at how the SNP has to both protest and oppose, and this won’t be an easy balancing act. This post orignally appeared on Holyrood. The SNP’s result at the General Election was nothing short of astounding. Despite being on the losing side of the referendum, the party has become a w... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The SNP have swept the electoral map in Scottish, winning all but three seats. With a Conservative government south of the border, Craig McAngus argues that the ‘significant change’ threshold put on another referendum by the SNP may now have been breached. This article originally appeared on LSE Bri... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The election of a significantly larger number of SNP MPs may open old discussions within the party about the strategy to achieve independence. Craig McAngus considers the tensions within the party, where they came from and where they’re going next. Apart from the decision to change party policy and... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Craig McAngus looks at how the SNP would manage the opportunity of a large Westminster presence, should that be what Scotland votes for, and how it's likely to be one of Sturgeon’s biggest challenges. This post originally appeared on The Conversation. With the launch of the long-awaited Scottish Nat... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
What do welfare proposals in the SNP manifesto mean? Craig McAngus investigates. This post originally appeared on The Conversation. The SNP’s 2015 manifesto devotes significant space to welfare. The future of the welfare state was a very important issue in the Scottish referendum campaign, with the... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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Latest blogs

  • 18th May 2018

    Different political actors have responded to the decision by the Scottish Parliament to withhold its consent for the UK Government’s showpiece EU (Withdrawal) Bill in very different ways. Prof Nicola McEwen sifts the facts from the hyperbole and explains where we are and where we go from here.

  • 15th May 2018

    On 8 May the UK’s House of Lords passed an amendment to require the House of Commons to vote on remaining in the European Economic Area (EEA), the possibility of Britain adopting the so-called ‘Norway model’ is back on the agenda of British politics. Here the authors of Squaring the Circle on Brexit: Could the Norway Model Work?, John Erik Fossum and Hans Petter Graver, give some background to Norway’s relationship with the European Union and reveal the truth behind some common myths about the Norway model.

  • 4th May 2018

    The Sewel Convention has historically worked well, says Michael Keating, but Brexit will put it to the test.

  • 3rd May 2018

    Amendments to controversial Clause 11 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill were agreed in the House of Lords yesterday evening, following a deal between the UK and Welsh governments last week. Jack Sheldon and Mike Kenny explain the significance of this agreement for the UK as a whole and outline a number of unresolved issues it raises.

  • 2nd May 2018

    The hesitant progress of Brexit legislation through Westminster has provided parliament with an opportunity to show its teeth and, says Tobias Lock, it demonstrates that the legislature has bite as well as bark.

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