Clare de Mowbray

Clare de Mowbray's picture
Clare
de Mowbray
Job Title: 
Research Projects Officer
Organisation: 
University of Edinburgh
Phone Number: 
+44(0) 131 6514744
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Clare takes a leading role on web communications and strategy; including digital marketing, social media activities, database management and event organisation.

Project Job Role: 
Research Projects Officer, School of Social and Political Science

History

Blog
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Member for
5 years 6 months

Posts by this author:

11 November 2015There has rightly been much focus on discussing the opportunities that devolved welfare powers provide to improve the delivery of welfare in Scotland. This note considers the way that issues of financing and fiscal governance are likely to influence the way that new powers are used (... Read more
Post type: Publication
11 November 2015Evidence to Inquiry into the Future Delivery of Social Security in Scotland submitted by Professor Nicola McEwen, University of Edinburgh & Associate Director, Centre on Constitutional Change.
Post type: Publication
The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) has donated hundreds of press clippings to the National Library of Scotland (NLS), documenting coverage of the independence referendum featuring teams from its Future of the UK and Scotland programme. Scottish and UK-wide newspapers featured the resear... Read more
Post type: News Article
Responding to William Hague’s statement in the Commons earlier this afternoon, Fellows of the Centre on Constitutional Change have made the following comments: Professor Michael Keating, Director of the Centre on Constitutional Change: “All parties now seem to have accepted that there is a ‘West Lot... Read more
Post type: News Article
In a consultation opening today the Law Commissions of England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland set out provisional proposals for reforming the law that governs the conduct of elections and referendums across the UK. Electoral law in the UK is spread across 25 major statutes. It has become i... Read more
Post type: News Article
Staff from Social Policy at The University of Edinburgh have been funded to run a research project into assessing how masses and elites differ in their attitudes towards the constitutional change process following the referendum on Scottish independence and ahead of the next general elections. Publi... Read more
Post type: News Article
Registration is now open for the David Hume Institute Winter 2015 seminar seriesPoliticians and the Professionals - 'What sort of Scotland do we wish to create?' Supported by:ICAS; the Law Society of Scotland; the RSE and the Institute and Faculty of ActuariesWith the referendum and the Smith Commis... Read more
Post type: News Article
The Smith commission’s report is due for publication on Thursday morning. Its proposals are likely to act as a hinge in Scotland’s devolutionary process, dividing discussions into pre- and post-Smith eras. In this new e-book, fellows of the ESRC Centre on Constitutional Change consider some of the i... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
At present, the devolved governments in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland get most of their money in the form of a block grant from the UK Treasury. How this grant changes from year-to-year is largely determined by the Barnett formula – which aims at providing the same pounds-per-person change in... Read more
Post type: News Article
The Carnegie UK Trust welcomes the opportunity to contribute to the work of the Smith Commission on the devolution of further powers to Scotland.The Carnegie UK Trust with the University of Edinburgh and ACOSVO hosted a half-day seminar for senior charity stakeholders to consider the range of possib... Read more
Post type: News Article

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Latest blogs

  • 19th February 2019

    Over the course of the UK’s preparations for withdrawing from the EU, the issue of the UK’s own internal market has emerged as an issue of concern, and one that has the potentially significant consequences for devolution. Dr Jo Hunt of Cardiff University examines the implications.

  • 12th February 2019

    CCC Fellow Professor Daniel Wincott of Cardiff University examines how Brexit processes have already reshaped territorial politics in the UK and changed its territorial constitution.

  • 7th February 2019

    The future of agriculture policy across the United Kingdom after Brexit is uncertain and risky, according to a new paper by Professor Michael Keating of the Centre on Constitutional Change. Reforms of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy over recent years have shifted the emphasis from farming to the broader concept of rural policy. As member states have gained more discretion in applying policy, the nations of the UK have also diverged, according to local conditions and preferences.

  • 4th February 2019

    In our latest report for the "Repatriation of Competences: Implications for Devolution" project, Professor Nicola McEwen and Dr Alexandra Remond examine how, in the longer term, Brexit poses significant risks for the climate and energy ambitions of the devolved nations. These include the loss of European Structural and Investment Funds targeted at climate and low carbon energy policies, from which the devolved territories have benefited disproportionately. European Investment Bank loan funding, which has financed high risk renewables projects, especially in Scotland, may also no longer be as accessible, while future access to research and innovation funding remains uncertain. The removal of the EU policy framework, which has incentivised the low carbon ambitions of the devolved nations may also result in lost opportunities.

  • 1st February 2019

    The outcome of the various Commons votes this week left certain only that the Government would either secure an amended deal and put it to a meaningful vote on Wednesday 13 February, or in the overwhelmingly likely absence of this make a further statement that day and table another amendable motion for the following day, the Groundhog Day that may lead to a ‘St Valentine’s Day Massacre’ for one side or the other. Richard Parry assesses the further two-week pause in parliamentary action on Brexit

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