Charlie Jeffery

Charlie Jeffery's picture
Professor
Charlie
Jeffery
Job Title: 
Senior Vice Principal; Professor of Politics
Organisation: 
University of Edinburgh
Phone Number: 
+44 (0)131 650 3553
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Charlie Jeffery was apppointed Senior Vice-Principal of the University of Edinburgh on 1 October 2014, having held a Chair of Politics at the University since 2004. He previously served as Vice-Principal for Public Policy (2012-2014), as Director of the Academy of Government (2011-2014), as Head of the School of Social and Political Science (2009-2012), and as Co-Director of the Institute of Governance (2004-2009). He previously held academic appointments at the University of Leicester and the University of Birmingham where he was appointed Professor of German Politics in 1999.

Project Job Role: 
Senior Vice Principal; Professor of Politics

History

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5 years 6 months

Posts by this author:

The Labour Party last week issued a pre-emptive strike on today’s proposals from the government on devolution to England. Charlie Jeffery, a co-author of the Future of England Study and former member of the MacKay Commission, suggests that it may be a case of ‘too little, too soon’ if they allow the... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Devolution (Further Powers) Committee, 11 December 2014 - Evidence from Professor Charlie Jeffery, Professor of Politics, University of Edinburgh The Smith Commission report was a compromise of often quite divergent positions that was crafted at speed. Already it has been criticised from a number of... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Lord Smith is due to present his report on proposed additional powers for the Scottish Parliament on 27 November. In the first of a series of blogs taken from our upcoming e-book, Beyond Smith: Contributions to the continuing process of Scottish devolution, Professor Charlie Jeffery considers how th... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Professor Charlie Jeffery and Professor Richard Wyn Jones reflect on the devolution debate that took place on the 14th October at the House of Commons, and the ‘English Question’. This article is taken from the What Scotland Thinks blog. Yesterday, the House of Commons finally had its big devolution... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Professor Charlie Jeffery reflects on the key findings of the 2014 Future of England Survey as debate on the constitutional question – and UKIP’s rise – unfolds in England. Scotland’s big question was resolved on 18 September 2014. Early the next morning David Cameron opened up the English question,... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The 2014 Future of England Survey discovers not only a distinct English identity but a strong and growing desire for England-wide solutions to English constitutional solutions. The survey of 3,705 adults in England found support for David Cameron's preferred option of English Votes for English Laws;... Read more
Post type: News Article
Professor Charlie Jeffery argues that the Conservative Party now occupies the middle ground among party views on more devolution in Scotland. So now the parties’ initial submissions on additional powers for the Scottish Parliament have been sent to Lord Smith, and can be downloaded from the Commissi... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Charlie Jeffery analyses the constitutional chain reaction that we now see unfolding before us. On 18th September 2014 the question was whether or not Scotland should be independent country, and on the morning of the 19th Prime Minister David Cameron announced he was looking for a decisive answer to... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
So Scotland voted no. Yes won 45% of the vote, significantly short of a majority and indeed what most of the polls in the run-up to the referendum suggested. Yes won in just four local authority areas, losing in 28. All in all a comprehensive defeat. Or is it? Is 45% in favour of independence that m... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Professor Charlie Jeffery, Director of the ESRC Future of the UK and Scotland teams, looks at the implications of the Prime Minister’s statement on the victory of the No campaign in the independence referendum. The referendum has been won by the Conservatives and their allies under the banner of Bet... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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Latest blogs

  • 22nd January 2019

    The UK is increasingly polarised by Brexit identities and they seem to have become stronger than party identities, a new academic report finds. Only one in 16 people did not have a Brexit identity, while more than one in five said they had no party identity. Sir John Curtice’s latest analysis of public opinion on a further referendum finds there has been no decisive shift in favour of another referendum. The report, Brexit and public opinion 2019, by The UK in a Changing Europe, provides an authoritative, comprehensive and up-to-date guide to public opinion on each of the key issues around Brexit. CCC Fellow, Dr Coree Brown Swan contributed a chapter on "the SNP, Brexit and the politics of independence"

  • 22nd January 2019

    In the papers accompanying the draft Environment (Principles and Governance) Bill published at the end of 2018, the UK Government says that it is “exploring opportunities to co-design the final proposals with the devolved administrations.” There are clear benefits in having strong co-operation and collaboration across the UK in the oversight of our environmental law and performance. Yet the challenge of finding a way forward in terms of working together is substantial since each part of the UK is in a different position at present. Given where things stand today, it may be better to accept that a good resolution is not possible immediately and to revisit the issue at a later stage - so long as there is a strong commitment to return and not allow interim arrangements to become fixed. Colin Reid, Professor of Environmental Law at the University of Dundee examines the issues.

  • 17th January 2019

    Richard Parry assesses a memorable day in UK parliamentary history as the Commons splits 432-202 on 15 January 2019 against the Government's recommended Brexit route. It was the most dramatic night at Westminster since the Labour government’s defeat on a confidence motion in 1979.

  • 17th January 2019

    What is the Irish government’s Brexit wish-list? The suggestion that Irish unity, as opposed to safeguarding political and economic stability, is the foremost concern of the Irish government is to misunderstand and misrepresent the motivations of this key Brexit stakeholder, writes Mary C. Murphy (University College Cork).

  • 17th January 2019

    Brexit is in trouble but not because of the Irish backstop, argues the CCC's Michael Keating.

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