Charlie Jeffery

Charlie Jeffery's picture
Professor
Charlie
Jeffery
Job Title: 
Senior Vice Principal; Professor of Politics
Organisation: 
University of Edinburgh
Phone Number: 
+44 (0)131 650 3553
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Charlie Jeffery was apppointed Senior Vice-Principal of the University of Edinburgh on 1 October 2014, having held a Chair of Politics at the University since 2004. He previously served as Vice-Principal for Public Policy (2012-2014), as Director of the Academy of Government (2011-2014), as Head of the School of Social and Political Science (2009-2012), and as Co-Director of the Institute of Governance (2004-2009). He previously held academic appointments at the University of Leicester and the University of Birmingham where he was appointed Professor of German Politics in 1999.

Project Job Role: 
Senior Vice Principal; Professor of Politics

History

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Member for
5 years 7 months

Posts by this author:

What the Scottish Government has proposed in its proposals for a differentiated Brexit settlement may evoke howls of protest from Downing Street but is actually fairly mainstream opinion.    So now we have it. The Scottish Government document Scotland’s Place in Europe sets out how the country might... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
If the internet polls are correct, England will vote narrowly to leave the EU but be held in by, principally, Scotland and Northern Ireland. Charlie Jeffery crunches the numbers to assess the territorial implications of the EU referendum vote.    Most analysis of voting intention in the upcoming ref... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Charlie Jeffery discusses the case that people in different parts of the UK now have very different views on the EU. Scotland has long had a reputation for being less sceptical about European integration than the rest of the UK, and in particular England. At the level of political leadership that is... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Charlie Jeffery discusses how the EU referendum has the potential to divide opinion in the UK on national lines. This post originally appeared on The UK in a Changing Europe. The EU referendum has the potential to divide opinion in the UK on national lines. Over the last few years people in England... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
As territorial parties make clear that their involvement in post-election arrangements will come with a hefty price tag, Charlie Jeffery considers this new form of 'pork barrel politics' in the UK.    The ‘pork barrel’ has long been a defining feature of American politics. The US political scientist... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Charlie Jeffery looks at the Conservatives conversion to EVEL and asks if it reflects genuine concerns about how England is governed or short-term tactical opportunism? So now we have it confirmed. David Cameron and William Hague last Friday pledged the introduction of English Votes on English Laws... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Charlie Jeffery looks at the current debate on the English question and how it is one of short-term political tactics. So now we know what EVEL looks like. William Hague yesterday selected the option for introducing EVEL - English Votes for English Laws - that the Conservative Party will campaign fo... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Charlie Jeffery says it's time for Labour to think of England. This blog originally appeared in the New Statesman The Labour Party has a problem with "EVEL". EVEL – English votes on English laws – describes various ideas on how MPs from England could be given a privileged, or even exclusive role in... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
This article was originally featured in The Herald Scotland's No vote last September was meant to draw a line under the UK's constitutional debate. Fat chance. What we have seen instead is a constitutional chain reaction let loose by pro-Union politicians making short-term calculations with little... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Today’s announcement by William Hague of a range of options for English Votes for English Laws should be seen as the start of a wider process, says Charlie Jeffery. That process is likely to include, at least, a clearer separation of England and Wales as jurisdictions and reform of how Westminster a... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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Latest blogs

  • 19th February 2019

    Over the course of the UK’s preparations for withdrawing from the EU, the issue of the UK’s own internal market has emerged as an issue of concern, and one that has the potentially significant consequences for devolution. Dr Jo Hunt of Cardiff University examines the implications.

  • 12th February 2019

    CCC Fellow Professor Daniel Wincott of Cardiff University examines how Brexit processes have already reshaped territorial politics in the UK and changed its territorial constitution.

  • 7th February 2019

    The future of agriculture policy across the United Kingdom after Brexit is uncertain and risky, according to a new paper by Professor Michael Keating of the Centre on Constitutional Change. Reforms of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy over recent years have shifted the emphasis from farming to the broader concept of rural policy. As member states have gained more discretion in applying policy, the nations of the UK have also diverged, according to local conditions and preferences.

  • 4th February 2019

    In our latest report for the "Repatriation of Competences: Implications for Devolution" project, Professor Nicola McEwen and Dr Alexandra Remond examine how, in the longer term, Brexit poses significant risks for the climate and energy ambitions of the devolved nations. These include the loss of European Structural and Investment Funds targeted at climate and low carbon energy policies, from which the devolved territories have benefited disproportionately. European Investment Bank loan funding, which has financed high risk renewables projects, especially in Scotland, may also no longer be as accessible, while future access to research and innovation funding remains uncertain. The removal of the EU policy framework, which has incentivised the low carbon ambitions of the devolved nations may also result in lost opportunities.

  • 1st February 2019

    The outcome of the various Commons votes this week left certain only that the Government would either secure an amended deal and put it to a meaningful vote on Wednesday 13 February, or in the overwhelmingly likely absence of this make a further statement that day and table another amendable motion for the following day, the Groundhog Day that may lead to a ‘St Valentine’s Day Massacre’ for one side or the other. Richard Parry assesses the further two-week pause in parliamentary action on Brexit

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