Andrew Neal

Andrew Neal's picture
Dr
Andrew
Neal
Job Title: 
Senior Lecturer - Politics and International Relations, School of Social and Political Science
Organisation: 
University of Edinburgh
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Andrew Neal is working on a book on parliamentary security politics.

He is principal convenor of the ESRC seminar series 'Security in Scotland, with or without constitutional change'.

His most recent book is "Exceptionalism and the politics of counter-terrorism: liberty, security and the war on terror" (Routledge 2010).

His research sits between international relations theory, political theory, sociology and security studies. He is particularly poststructural, critical, and sociological approaches to security; and the work and reception of Carl Schmitt and Michel Foucault in IR and security studies.

Twitter - @AndrewWNeal

Blog - securitypolitics.wordpress.com

Project Job Role: 
Senior Lecturer
Expertise: 

History

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5 years 1 week

Posts by this author:

Andrew Neal reports on the ‘Security in Scotland’ publication on intelligence and security oversight in an independent Scotland. The report notes that in order to ensure effective domestic oversight, an independent Scotland would need more politicians.  Today my colleagues and I have published our f... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Report on the fourth of six events in the seminar series: Security in Scotland, with or without constitutional change   Principal investigator and corresponding author:  Dr Andrew Neal, University of Edinburgh   Lead co-investigators: Dr Juliet Kaarbo (University of Edinburgh) Prof Charles Raab (Un... Read more
Post type: Publication
Report on the third of six events in the seminar series: Security in Scotland, with or without constitutional change Key points: Scotland to an extent already resembles a small western European state in its police and security arrangements. Scotland faces the same choices as its comparative neighbo... Read more
Post type: Publication
On January 31st 2014, Andrew Neal's project held the second of six seminars to discuss the security implications of Scottish independence. The event considered the risks and threats that the UK faces according to the National Security Strategy and whether these would be the same for an independent S... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
by Andrew Neal, Principal Convenor of the ESRC seminar series 'Security in Scotland, with or without constitutional change'. The security and intelligence plans in the white paper build on Scotland’s strengths in policing and resilience by proposing a single integrated security service. There are no... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The Home Secretary is disingenuous to claim that an independent Scotland would be left out of the loop on our island’s security, writes Dr Andrew Neal in the 12 November 2013 edition of The Scotsman. Theresa May’s Scotland Analysis: Security paper, published recently, is two things: factual and poli... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
This seminar report describes the first of six sessions designed to tackle the topic of 'Security in Scotland, with or without constitutional change'. The first session brought together policymakers, politicias, practioners, and academics to discuss how the current security arrangements work in Scot... Read more
Post type: Publication
Dr Andrew Neal blogs from the Festival of Politics 2013 This was an elegant lesson in democratic politics. A few in the audience wanted to heckle and speak out of turn. The rest were having none of it, insisting through a collective murmur that they should follow the unspoken rules. Similarly, the p... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

Latest blogs

  • 20th July 2018

    Richard Parry reviews a fast-evolving situation as the march of time and need to reconcile rhetoric and practicality constrain policy-makers

  • 13th July 2018

    The White Paper published this week talks about the UK Government making ‘sovereign decisions’ to adopt European rules but, as we know from the experience of Norway and Switzerland, this can be an illusory sovereignty when the costs of deviating from the rules is exclusion from the single market or European programmes. CCC Director Professor Michael Keating looks at whether the UK is ready for this kind of deal.

  • 12th July 2018

    Last week the government released its fisheries white paper. While most of the fisheries and Brexit debate centres on quotas and access to waters, there is also an important devolution dimension. Brexit already has profound consequences for the UK’s devolution settlement and fisheries policy is one example of this. So, in addition to communicating its overall vision for post-Brexit fisheries policy, the white paper was also an opportunity for the government to set out how it would see that policy working in the devolved UK.

  • 4th July 2018

    At the same time as Parliament prepares to ‘take back control’ from Brussels, the executive is in fact accruing to itself further control over the legislative process. CCC Fellow Professor Stephen Tierney addresses a number of trends – only some of which are a direct consequence of the unique circumstances of Brexit – which suggest a deeper realignment of institutional power within the constitution and a consequent diminution of Parliament’s legislative power.

  • 27th June 2018

    Faced with a choice between splitting her Cabinet into winners and losers, Theresa May has sought to keep the Brexit crap game going. She does this by avoiding betting on either a hard or soft Brexit. Professor Richard Rose of Strathclyde looks at the high stakes outcomes facing the Prime Minister. .

Read More Posts