Alan Convery

Alan Convery's picture
Dr
Alan
Convery
Job Title: 
Lecturer in Politics
Organisation: 
University of Edinburgh
Email Address: 
Biography: 

I completed my PhD at Strathclyde University in 2013. My thesis examined the impact of devolution on the Welsh and Scottish Conservative parties. I joined the School of Social and Political Science as a lecturer in September 2013. I previously taught at the universities of Strathclyde and Glasgow. You can follow me @AlanConvery.

Research interests

My research interests are in broadly three areas: conservatism and the UK Conservative Party (especially in Scotland and Wales); territorial politics and public policy; and British, Scottish and Welsh politics.

Visit Alan Convery's webpage on The University of Edinburgh website >>

Project Job Role: 
Politics and International Relations

History

Blog
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Member for
4 years 2 months

Posts by this author:

Posted orginally on the Academy of Government blog >> Tories should celebrate and then think of the Union The Scottish Conservatives have exceeded expectations by winning 13 seats in Scotland. This is the party’s best result in Scotland since 1983. It surpasses their previous tally of 11 MPs... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Much has been said about the possibility that the Conservatives could come second in May's Scottish Parliament election. However, says, Alan Convery, both their past record and the wider context mean they should be cautious about 2016.    Could this be the Scottish Conservatives’ moment? They have c... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
It has taken the Scottish Conservatives a long time to adjust to life in post-devolution Scotland. In particular, one question has overshadowed and constrained the party’s thinking: what is the appropriate Conservative response to the Scottish Parliament? The Scottish Conservatives arrived at a defi... Read more
Post type: Publication
Alan Convery asks, with diminished representation in Scotland, should the Scottish Labour Party consider separating entirely from the UK Labour Party? In common with the Conservatives, the Scottish Labour Party now knows what it feels like to have severely diminished representation in Scotland. This... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
New online course from the same University of Edinburgh team as last year's Referendum MOOC Understanding the UK's 2015 General Election This course provides an overview of the United Kingdom's 2015 general election. Join us right up to and through election night as we explore the politics, issues a... Read more
Post type: News Article
Alan Convery welcomes participants who would like to join our free #indyref online course. In just a few weeks’ time, we will know whether Scotland will stay in the United Kingdom or become an independent country. However, Scotland’s referendum debate can be difficult to navigate. Beyond the claims... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
For the Scottish Conservatives, the publication of the Strathclyde Commission report on further devolution marks another significant moment in a long journey for the party. Having passed from strident opposition to a Scottish Parliament to the Calman Commission and lines in the sand, they now have t... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

Latest blogs

  • 16th August 2018

    A week after the state of intergovernmental relations (IGR) in the UK was highlighted by the UK government’s law officers standing in opposition to their devolved counterparts in the UK Supreme Court, the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee published a report on improving IGR after Brexit. Jack Sheldon discusses the methods by which England could gain distinct representation — something it currently lacks — in a new IGR system.

  • 10th August 2018

    Brexit is re-making the UK’s constitution under our noses. The territorial constitution is particularly fragile. Pursuing Brexit, Theresa May’s government has stumbled into deep questions about devolution.

  • 8th August 2018

    The UK in a Changing Europe has formed a new Brexit Policy Panel (BPP). The BPP is a cross-disciplinary group of over 100 leading social scientists created to provide ongoing analysis of where we have got to in the Brexit process, and to forecast where we are headed. Members of the UK in a Changing Europe Brexit Policy Panel complete a monthly survey addressing three key areas of uncertainty around Brexit: if —and when—the UK will leave the EU; how Brexit will affect British politics; and what our relationship with the EU is likely to look like in the future. The CCC participates on the Panel.

  • 2nd August 2018

    The House of Commons Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee issued its report ‘Devolution and Exiting the EU: reconciling differences and building strong relationships’. Discussing its contents, Professor Nicola McEwen suggests that the report includes some practical recommendations, some of which were informed by CCC research. It also shines a light on some of the more difficult challenges ahead.

  • 31st July 2018

    The politicisation of Brexit, combined with deteriorating relations between London and Dublin, has created a toxic atmosphere in Northern Ireland, says Mary Murphy, which will require imagination and possibly new institutions to resolve.

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