Posts by Richard Parry

The most dramatic night at Westminster since the Labour government’s defeat on a confidence motion in 1979 is writing itself as a sequel to James Graham’s 2012 play This House about events forty years ago. Labour’s Tulip Siddiq, unwell, pregnant, wheelchair-bound, played a cameo role, parked next... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
  The deal (Withdrawal Agreement)  ‘would be an uncomfortable outcome for the European Union: providing quota-fee, tariff-free access to the EU market without any accompanying financial obligations; without any access to UK fishing waters in the absence of further agreement; and without any... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
With the politics of the process changing almost by the minute, Richard Parry assesses the ‘stable text’ of the Brexit agreement.    The final phase of negotiating action in recent days was when the EU27 started to push back against some aspects of the UK-wide solution on Ireland upon realising... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
As the buildup to the EU Council meeting reaches fever pitch, Richard Parry explains that deals at dawn may work in Brussels but they don't always play to the home crowd.  Sometimes in politics setbacks can actually be set-ups, designed to give political propulsion to the outcome that is eventually... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Richard Parry reviews a fast-evolving situation as the march of time and need to reconcile rhetoric and practicality constrain policy-makers.  The UK government’s White Paper of 12 July marked the culmination of the government’s negotiation with itself as it picked cherries even more precisely,... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Richard Parry discusses the interacting policies on devolution and Brexit in the current impasse between UK and devolved governments. As part of their unfolding tactics on Brexit, the Scottish and Welsh Governments have through their legislators taken powers to alter inherited EU-based law in... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Richard Parry discusses the attempts to express political objectives in secure legal wording as Brexit progresses   On 20 December 2017 the  EU Commission set out its draft supplementary negotiating guidelines for the next phase of the Brexit negotiations, during which the arrangements for UK... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The post-Hogmanay atmosphere is always sobering, and never more than this year when the party may be over for some many people in so many ways. During 2017, three great political experiments - Brexit, the Trump Presidency and the Catalonian independence project - failed to progress beyond the... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Richard Parry reflects on the first-stage agreement between the UK and EU that defuses political of tension but has little comfort for the proponents of Brexit and leaves all to play for in the territorial politics of Britain and Ireland.    Sometimes even the best-trailed political events happen... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Richard Parry discusses the impact of three speeches in Florence, Glasgow and Barcelona.    Carles Puigdemont asked his Parliament on 10 October, ‘if that has been possible in one of the oldest, most constituted and exemplary democracies in the world, as in the United Kingdom, why could it not also... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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  • 22nd January 2019

    The UK is increasingly polarised by Brexit identities and they seem to have become stronger than party identities, a new academic report finds. Only one in 16 people did not have a Brexit identity, while more than one in five said they had no party identity. Sir John Curtice’s latest analysis of public opinion on a further referendum finds there has been no decisive shift in favour of another referendum. The report, Brexit and public opinion 2019, by The UK in a Changing Europe, provides an authoritative, comprehensive and up-to-date guide to public opinion on each of the key issues around Brexit. CCC Fellow, Dr Coree Brown Swan contributed a chapter on "the SNP, Brexit and the politics of independence"

  • 22nd January 2019

    In the papers accompanying the draft Environment (Principles and Governance) Bill published at the end of 2018, the UK Government says that it is “exploring opportunities to co-design the final proposals with the devolved administrations.” There are clear benefits in having strong co-operation and collaboration across the UK in the oversight of our environmental law and performance. Yet the challenge of finding a way forward in terms of working together is substantial since each part of the UK is in a different position at present. Given where things stand today, it may be better to accept that a good resolution is not possible immediately and to revisit the issue at a later stage - so long as there is a strong commitment to return and not allow interim arrangements to become fixed. Colin Reid, Professor of Environmental Law at the University of Dundee examines the issues.

  • 17th January 2019

    Richard Parry assesses a memorable day in UK parliamentary history as the Commons splits 432-202 on 15 January 2019 against the Government's recommended Brexit route. It was the most dramatic night at Westminster since the Labour government’s defeat on a confidence motion in 1979.

  • 17th January 2019

    What is the Irish government’s Brexit wish-list? The suggestion that Irish unity, as opposed to safeguarding political and economic stability, is the foremost concern of the Irish government is to misunderstand and misrepresent the motivations of this key Brexit stakeholder, writes Mary C. Murphy (University College Cork).

  • 17th January 2019

    Brexit is in trouble but not because of the Irish backstop, argues the CCC's Michael Keating.

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