Posts by Michael Kenny

In the latest blog in our "Twenty Years of Devolution" series, CCC Fellow Professor Michael Kenny (University of Cambridge) ponders the omission of England from the UK's twenty year old devolution settlement. The UK’s devolution settlement is based upon a striking form of asymmetry as Northern... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
‘I didn’t know it would break the United Kingdom’. This regretful rumination from columnist Peter Oborne – in a fascinating interview given in the wake of the recanting of his support for Brexit – touches on one of the key developments in the Brexit story. This is the gathering realisation in some... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Professor Michael Kenny and Jack Sheldon discuss a new report from the Centre on Constitutional Change and the Bennett Institute offering a comprehensive analysis of the weaknesses that bedevil the machinery for relations between the UK government and the devolved governments in Scotland, Wales and... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
With little enough fanfare, Cabinet Office Minister David Liddington MP set out how Britain will operate post-Brexit. Prof Michael Kenny and Jack Sheldon consider what he had to say.   Last Monday Cabinet Office minister David Lidington delivered to little fanfare one of the most significant... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Labour’s Unavoidable English Question   In 2015, the Conservative government implemented ‘English Votes for English Laws’ (or EVEL) in the House of Commons as a way of responding to the ‘English Question’. Labour, by contrast, has had relatively little to say in this area – but were the party to... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
"Will the Prime Minister provide a commitment today that no part of the great repeal bill will be subject to English votes for English laws?” This seemingly technical query – posed by the SNP’s Kirsty Blackman at PMQs the day after the Prime Minister had outlined the government’s plans for Brexit... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In the aftermath of Brexit, there has been an upsurge of interest in English nationalism. But what exactly is English nationalism, where does it come from, and what role, if any, did it play in the referendum outcome? In this extended article, Michael Kenny investigates. This article appeared... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The notion that English nationalism has played a causal role in the EU referendum debate has widely been both accepted and promoted. Alongside this is a portrait of two Englands; one progressive and cosmopolitan, the other populist and nationalist. Mike Kenny argues that this Manichean dichotomy is... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The UK government's recent defeat on its proposals to relax Sunday trading rules saw the votes of Scottish MPs prove decisive, although the policy would have applied only in England and Wales. Daniel Gover and Michael Kenny discuss why the English Votes for English Laws rules could not help the... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
As the European referendum comes to loom ever larger in British politics, it is apparent that a number of distinct, pulsating national questions will do much to affect its outcome. For a start, divergent views on this issue may well lead to the exacerbation of territorial tensions across the UK,... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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